A Journey through Canada’s NEW Food Guide: What Educators Need to Know

A Journey through Canada’s NEW Food Guide: What Educators Need to Know


-Welcome and thank you for joining us for a journey through Canada’s new food guide with educators see to know webinar. My name is Kristin Berfelz. I’m a projects leader here with Ophea. I want to draw your attention to the chatroom that is in the bottom right-hand corner of the Adobe Connect room that you can use to ask and respond a question during the webinar including the minds-on question and I see a lot of you have started to respond to. We will have a question and answer section at the end of the webinar for any final question. Today, we will be hearing from Cara Rosenbloom and Robin McDonald who will be sharing information on Canada’s new food guide. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the Helderleigh Foundation for their partnership on this webinar. The Helderleigh Foundation is Canada’s leading foundation exclusively dedicated to enhancing food literacy envisioning a society of better informed young children and their families consuming healthier foods and beverages. Today, we will be discussing Canada’s new food guide strategies for teaching Canada’s Food Guide as well as, touching on some additional resources and allowing an opportunity for some questions and answers at the end of the webinar. Today, we’ll be hearing from Robin McDonald who is an ambassador for Ophea and
a specialist health and physical education and special education teacher with the Near North District School Board. Her passion lies with helping children to learn to appreciate the life long benefits of healthy active living in traditional outdoor education context. When she’s not teaching or working with Ophea Robin spends her time paddling, skiing hiking and exploring the forest in the Muskoka area where she lives with her husband and three young children. We’ll also be hearing from Cara Rosenbloom who is a dietitian and owner of Words to Eat By a Toronto based nutrition education company. Cara started her career at the Hospital for Sick Children which solidified her interest in pedediatrics. She writes about nutrition for Today’s Parent Chatelaine and The Washington Post and is currently working on her second book Food to Grow On. Which is about nutrition during pregnancy infancy and early childhood. She is a mom of two wonderfully funny kids aged 12 and 8. We’ll hear from Cara first. -Thank you. I’m excited to get started and jump right in and talk to everybody today about the new Canada’s Food Guide and tell you what you need to know. The question about the food guide is it’s very different than what you may have seen before. If you’ve taught the food guide before or if you grew up in Canada and learned about the food guide at when you were a student you’ll see if you’ve looked on the website or heard about it on the news this one is now totally different. What I’m going to do today is I’m going to take you through the history of the food guide. Give you a little bit of background about why. A lot of the time we teach the food guide but we don’t really understand the history of it or the point of it. That really helps us understand why it’s an important tool for Canadians. We are going to look at the new guide and instead of just examining what to eat we’re really going to look beyond that. About why we eat and eating habits and how to make better choices because that’s how the new food guide is laid out. Then Robin is going to talk about offering ideas for teaching the guide and I will help out with that as well. Before we get started we just have one poll question we want to take you through. We want to know from you if you taught the new food guide in your lessons plan last year. The food guide did come out in January. We want to know if between January and June people did teach the food guide. Your responses can be, no, yes, or not applicable. We’ll just give everybody a few minutes to vote. What I’m seeing is that 25% of people said no, they didn’t teach it. 27% said, yes, and then the other 50% said it wasn’t applicable either. They weren’t teaching the food guide last year. They’re not teachers or something similar. Very interesting. Thank you for that. This is a good start to figure out where we’re all at with the food guide. In order to really understand what the food guide is all about it’s important to look back in time and say, “Where did this food guide really come from and where are we now because of our history.” Interestingly, the food guide has been around for a really long time. It was introduced in 1942. The first guide was actually introduced during wartime rationing because the government wanted to help prevent nutritional deficiencies. This was a time where there was not a lot of disposable income. The government wanted to make sure people were making every bite count. They wanted to know that you’re meeting your nutritional needs. That’s what the first food guide was based on. Of course, the guides have changed and taken on different forms over the years. The core concept really remains the same. That suited as an educational tool to help people learn to follow a healthy diet. This is important because the food guide itself is just an education. It itself is not a diet. I think that’s where a lot of confusion lies historically is that people would think they needed to eat and plan every meal to match exactly what the food guide information was giving. That was never the intent of the food guide it’s much more guidance tool than a really strict diet. That’s not at all what the government is trying to encourage. Interestingly, I often hear people say “I don’t follow the food guide. What do I think I’m going to post it on my fridge and follow it every day.” Most people lack at the idea of the food guide and they’ll say, “I don’t follow it anyway.” What I want to point out is why we actually have the food guide in Canada. Even if you don’t personally use it. You’re touched by the food guide in ways you might not think of. If you ever have been in a hospital for any amount of time and eaten a meal there or had a loved one or friend or family member in the hospital or in a retirement center or a long term care center or if you ever had a child in school that has a subsidized lunch program or used daycare facility. All of the foods and all of the menus for any of those places are all designed and developed based on government information in Canada’s Food Guide. Even if you don’t think you use the food guide it’s in all of these touchdown places that we’re all using. Of course, for those who are educators and teachers it is part of the health and physical education curriculum. It touches us in many places. The other thing I think is important about Canada’s Food Guide and teaching and learning about it is the basic concept that everybody eats. Everybody who’s listening to the call today is going to have dinner at some point. Maybe breakfast tomorrow. Maybe lunch after that. We all eat. There’s this general interest about nutrition and whether you take away today is how you’re going to teach it or you take something away of how you’re going to manage your own diet. Everybody eats and you’re going to get something really handy out of today’s presentation. Historically the food guide has always been grouped into different colorful sections. Depending on when you were born and when you were educated there may be a guide here on the screen that you personally recognize. Maybe you learned one of these in school. Maybe you taught one of these as a teacher in a school. These have changed over the years. As diets have become more varied and our multicultural population blossomed the guide would start to offer more robust food choices. For example, in 1961 in the milk category we just had milk, liquid milk, plain milk. In 1977, we started talking more about cheese and yogurt. There was a little bit more variety to talk about that carried on until 1992 as well. By 2007, we were acknowledging that there are also plant-based options that people can try, like Soy beverages. The guide has always changed over the years but it was the static food guide of four food groups until now. What you seeing before you is one part of the food guide called the Food to Eat Well Plate. This is a part of the food guide that makes up one small part of a whole food guide which is now an online tool rather than a static piece of paper to hand out in the classroom. It is a much more robust tool than we’ve ever seen in the past. You’re probably wondering why. Why all the changes? I’m going to get to that but first I want to ask you a question. We know that not all Canadians understood the old food guide. What I want to ask you is what percent of Canadians do you think could name the four food groups from the last version the 2007 version of the food guide? I’m just going to wait a minute for responses and we’ll see what people think. Interesting. There’s definitely not one agreed-upon response. Most people think it was 62% that was the answer. Close, it was actually 42%. It was actually the lowest option possible. People didn’t really understand Canada’s Food Guide. To make matters even worse when we asked Canadians “Can you name the four food groups?” Only 42% said it. To make matters even worse when we said to them “Let’s say you know Vegetable and fruit is a food group. How much do you need to eat? How many servings of vegetables and fruit you need to eat in that food group or any of the food groups?” Less than 1% of Canadians could answer that question. That led researchers to believe Canada’s Food Guide was not being well used because it was not understood. It was too complex and the research we later learned was becoming out of date. It’s been 12 years since the last food guide came out. In the world of nutrition to nutrition research things change really quickly. 12 years is a really long time to go without updating a government document so it really was time for a change for that particular reason. The other thing that comes up a lot is that the old Food Guide had more industry influence than Canadians liked. What does that mean? When the last Food Guide was put together the government consulted with the food industry. That can mean commodity groups like the dairy farmers beef farmers, egg farmers the Vegetable Oil Council of Canada. It could also mean packaged food companies Kellogg’s, Kraft, Unilever, et cetera. These people had a voice in developing the Food Guide and because of that, the Food Guide had a bias to let in foods that maybe not were evidence-based or based on research but were based on what the deep pockets of the food industry wanted. Canadians had been complaining about that for a very long time. They changed the way the Food Guide was developed this time by not allowing industry to have a seat at the table. With that, I’m happy to introduce the panel of who developed the new Food Guide if it wasn’t the food industry who was it? The new Food Guide was developed by a panel of nutrition, food, health and environment experts from across Canada and led by the Health Canada Office of Health Policy and Promotion so interestingly it was led at the time by a naturalpathic doctor. Lots of dieticians and Ph.D. nutrition researchers on board there and for the first time ever they also had Canadians had the chance to review the guide before it was final and Canadians were allowed to submit their thoughts. Whether you’re a teacher or a dietician or a doctor or a nurse or a parent or a food industry executive you could all submit ideas and feedback. That was the only way that industry folks could submit their voice or their opinion. After consultation the Health Canada released the news that 6,000 people commented during the process and the process was so transparent this time to avoid industry influence that you can actually go online and read the results of what the 6,000 people said. It’s all amalgamated into one document you don’t have to read 6,000 comments. What is the new guide based on? Instead of industry influence it’s based on the best available science. Collectively this group looked at reports from the World Health Organization the Canadian Cardiovascular Society organizations on cancer research the Food and Agriculture Organization and no industry reports were excluded. It was all unbiased information just giving us the science. What they came up with is this if you have a handout in your classroom or a public health unit that you order from Health Canada this is what you will receive. It is a front and back handout this is called the Food Guide snapshot. The snapshot features the Food Guide plate on the front of it and on the back of it it reminds us that healthy eating is more than just the foods that we choose to eat it’s also about being mindful and eating with others and cooking more so there’s more kind of instruction on the back of it. You can download this PDF or you can order it from the government, right on the website. We have a link to that if anybody wants to order we do have the link. As I mentioned earlier, the Food Guide now is more than just the handout it’s actually a website. Health Canada is really encouraging people to use a whole suite of online resources not just use the one-page handout. For those who have been to the website you may have seen some of these other facets already. For those who haven’t I’ll just go over briefly what is on the website. You do have the snapshot there and PDF form posters and handouts. You also have lots of tips and healthy eating recommendations that consumers will read and then, of course, you also have the evidence behind the Food Guide. As an educator, if you want to learn why certain recommendations were made or what research it was based on you have the ability to go on and download the 62-page evidence behind the Food Guide document which is quite an interesting read if you like the science of food and nutrition, I loved it. There’s also recipes from Heart and Stroke Foundation there’s some little vignettes and videos some of them are great to show in a classroom may also go over the history of the Food Guide and offers lots of tips and advice. They do say with the website it is a living document and there is more to come so there’ll always be something more to have. Now, we’re going to talk about each section of the Food Guide in a little more depth and point out what the students in your classroom may need to know about it. The first half of the Food Guide is the front and that is about what to eat. This is our Food Guide plate. What this is explaining is a little bit different that the four food groups. Instead of that we now have three proportions. The guidance here is to explain to students or whoever you’re teaching to fill half of your plate with vegetables and fruit a quarter of it with foods that contain protein and a final quarter of foods that are made with whole grains. Interestingly, for the first time ever the emphasis in the protein food section is not on meat and milk as was in the old Food Guide but the emphasis is on choosing plant-based foods more often. A food that comes from a plant that has protein or things like lentils, chickpeas beans, nut seeds that kind of thing, whole grains. A little bit different of the view and again, that’s where you can really see that the industry did not influence the guide as much because it’s not based on beef, eggs and dairy like it used to be. It by no means is cutting out animal foods out at all that is not the idea of the Food Guide it’s just saying to people “You can have plant foods and animal foods.” In the little section of protein they show all different options. I’m going to go into each of these quadrants in a little bit more detail. There’s two questions that often come up when I teach the Food Guide especially to children. The first thing children are going to ask when they see this picture is “When I’m eating do I actually have to divide my plate into three quadrants? What if I’m having spaghetti and meatballs and it’s all mixed together, is that okay?” Of course, that’s okay. That’s why the Food Guide and Health Canada also put out the picture on the right-hand side of the screen which shows that you can mix your rice and peas and mushrooms and you could even mix the fish right in. You don’t have to actually put your food into little quadrants when you eat it. That’s just telling you on your plate that’s how much you want to have so the proportions are key. It doesn’t matter if they’re mixed together or not. The other question that some kids ask me is “Do I need to eat every food that’s in this picture? For example, the fruits and vegetables do I need to eat broccoli and carrots and strawberries and blueberries and apples and peas all at one meal?” Of course not. The idea of this is to show variety. Any of those, one of those, two of those six of those, whatever you want on your plate. It doesn’t matter how many as long as you get some vegetables and fruits some protein and some whole grains. The first quadrant we’re going to talk about in a little more depth is the vegetables and fruits. We want those to fill half the plate because they are so nutrient-dense. For the first time ever Canada’s Food Guide no longer counts juice as a serving of whole vegetables and fruits. The reason for that is because juice is higher in sugar because it takes a lot more fruit to make juice than if you were eating fruit itself. For example, most people wouldn’t sit down and eat four apples but it’s easy to drink a cup of apple juice and that’s four apples and the sugar adds up really quickly. It does not count as a serving of fruit. Lots of different things count to fill half your plate for the vitamins and minerals, fresh frozen and canned options are all fantastic. Before I introduce some of the protein section foods I want to get your feedback. I want you to check all that apply which of these foods would fall into the protein section of Canada’s Food Guide. I’ll give everybody a minute to sort through those options. You click on the ones that are a source of protein and we’ll see what we get. So far steak’s coming up as a source of protein you’re all correct about that one. Of course almonds, good. Peanut butter, yes. Cheese, yes. The ones that are not coming up as highly from people as sources of protein of course, are green beans which would fall into the vegetable group avocado which would fall into the vegetable group. Excellent, that’s good. You guys have a good understanding of what the protein foods are which is fantastic. We’ll take you through a little bit of the protein section now. Protein foods that come from plants are recommended by Health Canada, why is that? The main reason is because they are inexpensive they don’t have saturated fat or cholesterol like animal foods do and a lot of them are grown in Canada. We have a really robust pulse growing country in Ontario and in the prairie provinces we grow chickpeas and white beans and lentils and those kind of things. We’re just trying to get more people to eat them. We export more than we actually eat in our country. Animal foods are fantastic foods. These are real, whole wonderful natural foods. Steak is fine, beef is fine, pork, eggs, fish chicken, poultry, turkey all of that is totally part of Canada’s Food Guide. They’ve been some rumors and some miscommunication in the media somehow that Canada Food Guide is now pushing people to go vegetarian that is not the case at all. All of those foods can fit in the protein section as can dairy foods like milk and yogurt and cheese there’s just no longer a separate section for meat and a separate section for milk because meat and milk and those products all contain protein they just grouped it together as protein foods to make it simpler for people to understand. We’re going to do the same kind of audience trivia. This one’s a little bit trickier. These are all grains, but Health Canada is particularly recommending whole grains. That means all parts are still intact and the grain has not been refined. Which ones do you think are whole grains? I’ll give everybody a minute to come up with it. Brown rice, coming up on top that’s definitely a whole grain. All right, I’m going to go over the list. Brown rice was correctly answered definitely a whole grain, as is quinoa. Quinoa is actually a seed but in the culinary world it’s used as a whole grain. Basmati rice, you guys are right. It is not a whole grain there is brown basmati rice available but it does not taste as good as white basmati rice. I don’t recommend it. Oats, of course, are a whole grain. Couscous is a tricky one that tricks people up a lot of the time. I’m going to tell you the truth about couscous. Imagine taking a piece of spaghetti and cutting it up into teeny, teeny, teeny tiny pieces. That’s what couscous is couscous is white flour it’s Durham semolina that is cut to the smallest possible pasta size that’s available. Couscous is just white pasta but because it has internationally sounding name it sounds like a whole grain. It’s not it’s just pasta. Barley is a confusing one because there’s two kinds of barley on grocery store shelves, pot, and Pearl. The pot barley is a whole grain but the pearl barley is not, and then good news for people who didn’t answer the popcorn one with the correct information popcorn is a whole grain. Now of course if you mix it with butter and salt it’s not as healthy an option but popcorn itself is a whole grain it does count as a serving of whole-grain foods. That takes us to our grain, we talked about some of the examples of whole grain is one that has all three parts. Those are the brand the germ, and the endosperm. When we take away the brand and the germ we take away the fiber vitamins and minerals and all we’re left with is starch that’s what white rice and white flour are. They’re not as nutritious because we get rid of the fiber the vitamins, and the minerals. The food guide also talks about healthy drink choices and really tells us that water is the best beverage for hydration. For those who drink coffee and tea those are 99% water, those count as good choices too what the Food Guide does encourage us to limit our things like pop, juice or anything that’s sugar-sweetened. Sugar-sweetened beverages are the number one source of sugar in the diet of Canadians. It’s not gummy bears, it’s not ice cream it’s things like pop and juice and those kinds of things provide more sugar than anything else so we want to be wary of that. That’s kind of a what to eat and the biggest change is of course if you want to group them together this is kind of a fun chart if you have kids that you’re teaching who are in the older grades and they’ve learned the Food Guide for years instead of just going over what’s on the food guide you can actually compare the old food guide with the new food guide to show the difference. Things like the four food groups are now three food groupings the less of an emphasis on milk and meat and in plant-based protein instead industry influence versus no industry influence instead of being complicated, it’s simpler. I’m not going to go over the whole chart but it’s a nice chart for learning. The biggest change for Canada’s Food Guide and the one that most dietitians are most excited about because we’ve been saying this for years it’s not just about what you eat. What you eat is part of the equation because you want to choose nutritious foods and they do provide that guidance but beyond what you eat, there’s so much more and for the first time they’re really really helping Canadians learn how to develop a healthy relationship with food and that is what is so broken in our culture. We have this diet culture and this unrealistic drive for fitness or fitness that is so pervasive and it’s really harming the self-esteem of children who are growing up on one hand in obesogenic environment where fat food is everywhere and unhealthy food is the easiest, cheapest quickest thing to get but at the same time they’re bombarded with messages from celebrities about having to be fit and thin and use detox teas. It’s just so crazy what they’re faced with. Canada’s Food Guide is trying to tackle that head-on to say the Food Guide is about more than just what we eat. It’s about the how and the why and the where and the when and those are what they’re trying to answer with the backside of Canada’s Food Guide. The first thing that they’re talking about is practicing mindfulness and that basically means the how and why and what it allows you to make healthier choices because you’re thinking about food before mindfully eating. Instead of going to the Food Court and buying lunch that’s not really healthy just because you’re hungry and you want to fill your stomach if you think mindfully maybe the night before you make a lunch and you bring it with you. It’s about kind of planning and being mindful of what you think. The interesting thing about mindfulness also dictates how much you should need to be eating is based on what your body is telling you and it’s such a basic premise but most Canadians don’t think this way at all which is eat when you’re hungry and stop when you start to feel full. Doesn’t that sound really simple? Interestingly, children have an innate built-in sense of satiety of fullness and when the society at large bombard them with food all the time in these huge portions it starts to override their sense of fullness and they tend to start overeating. If we all could eat the way babies and young children did which is of pushing the tray away or closing their mouth when they’re done eating we’d be so much better off but this gets overwritten. Kids do have an innate instinct to eat when they’re hungry and stop when they’re full and listening to their appetite can really help them learn to be competent and balanced eaters as they grow up. The opposite of that, though is something to be aware of because if you are a parent or if you’re in a classroom and you have the ability to guide food choices, telling kids things like finish all the food in your lunch box or finish your tray of food, or eat all your food is a really negative concept because it lets them ignore their own cues for fullness. You want them to be able to manage their own cues. It’s also vital if you’re a teaching in the classroom not to classify the foods that the kids are eating as good or bad or rate the children’s lunches because well awareness is vital for them to know that there are foods in the food guide that are very nutritious. The judgment of that can be very harmful and we want to help kids promote positive associations with food and nutrition to gently guide them in the right direction rather than to make them feel bad about their snacks or shaming the food that they eating or feeling that way at all. That’s an important consideration. All right, I have another trivia question for you and this one is a true or false. I want to know, does dining with family help kids get better grades and have fewer behavior problems? You guys know the answer to this one? Of course, the answer to that one is it is actually true. There’s been tons of research done in this area and not only does dining with others help with better grades and better communication. Studies also show that it helps kids have healthier eating habits into adulthood lower risk of eating disorders less use of cigarettes drugs and alcohol, better self-esteem less chance of depression, less truancy. There’s huge reasons to dine together and whether that is if your individuals on the phone and have your own family and they’re eating with others or you eat together in a staff room or in school room or you’re eating with the children it’s so important to eat together because it’s really really healthy for everybody. Providing students the opportunity to eat with their peers at school can offer benefits that help create positive school climate through mealtime socialization. There’s lots of benefits that really come from dining together. It’s also important to shop, cook and enjoy food. Worrying about counting every calorie is a thing of the past. We’re trying to say goodbye to diet culture. That’s why the Food Guide no longer says you need to have six portions of this and each portion is 125 milliliters and three ounces of this and weigh your food we don’t talk like that anymore. It’s now, here’s your plate but lots of fruits and vegetables on it some protein and some whole grains. It’s much much more simple we don’t want people counting calories and we want kids to learn how to enjoy their food starting at a young age. This area of the food guide really helps people remember to taste the flavors of their food be open to trying new things, shop and cook grow your own food, go to farmer’s markets go to grocery stores. There’s even some in some regions if you have a Loblaws b with a dietitian on-site they will actually take students through grocery store tours and help them fill a healthy shopping cart for free. It’s a nice school field trip that you can do. The other great thing about cooking and preparing food is it can support healthy eating habits and allow for skill-building and it actually merges really well with a lot of the curriculum. Things like math and reading and language can be part of following recipes. The other things that the food guide touches on are learning how to read labels this also can be part of different math units or reading units at different ages and it’s fun to take kids through that exercise depending on what age they’re at. There’s different ways to teach it which Robin will talk a little bit more about. One more audience trivia question, true or false? Canadians eat about 50% of their daily calories from ultra-processed food. Those would be things like burgers, pizza, chips pop candy, baked goods, and ice cream. Does that seem like that’s a lot does it seem like it’s a little? Seeing people think it’s true a couple of people think it’s false. Let’s see what we land. I think we’re landing on overall people think that’s true. Sad, but true. Imagine that imagine eating every single day 50% half of the food Canadians eat every single day is junk food. These are some statistics gathered by the Heart and Stroke Foundation last year. In America, it’s about 60% of the foods they eat is junk food. We’re doing a little bit better than the Americans but that’s not saying much because that means that 50% of the food we eat every day are the kind of foods that increase the risk of developing heart disease type two diabetes, osteoporosis cancer, Alzheimer’s, dementia. It really is a diet problem. One of the other things that Canada’s Food Guide is trying to encourage Canadians to do is to limit their intake of ultra-processed foods. I’m not going to list them all you guys probably all know the difference between an apple and Apple Jack cereal or an apple neutral grain bar. One is of healthy fresh food the other is an ultra-processed food and the overall message here has to do with limiting foods that are really high in sodium and sugar and saturated or trans fat. That is a big difference. Even worse than the fact that Canadians eat 50% of calories from ultra-processed food is that children eat almost 60% children age 9-13 eat 57.2% of calories from ultra-processed food and that right there my friend is the reason why teaching the Food Guide is so vital. The other thing we want to talk about in class and this comes up in different curriculums too is media literacy, is understanding that food can be marketed falsely. From ultra-processed chips being called veggie sticks to gummy candy being labeled as real fruit food marketing can trick us adult and child alike into thinking that junk food is good for us. The perfect example is the Brookfield dark chocolate covered blueberries. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve met with over the years eat those as fruit when they’re really no different than gloss that chocolate covered raisins. They just are fancier because they’re blueberries and dark chocolate, but healthy is healthy and ultra-processed is ultra-processed. Marketing really can influence us to buy certain foods even when we don’t realize it and it tricks all of us. Kids can really benefit from learning about food marketing at a young age so they’re less susceptible to those messages. The other thing the food guide talks about now that it never has before is the importance of the environment. We know global warming and climate change are big topics. This is the first time that eating for the reason of social awareness of environmental awareness has come into it and that’s one of the drives towards why they’re saying to eat more plant-based foods because it’s an environmentally friendly decision. Finally, culture. There are 250 ethnic origins in Canada and we want to celebrate them with food guide and Robin is going to take you through some ways on how you can do that. -Hi, everybody, I just wanted to give you some context about myself. I am currently assigned as a special ed teacher in my school however, I teach Health and Physical Education all the way from kindergarten to grade eight. That being said I have also taught at a secondary level. I like to think I’ve got a bit of a breadth of experience in teaching some of this stuff and I really wanted to delve into some of the things we’re going to talk about today because I think one of the really neat things is that with the advent of this new food guide we also have the advent of a new health and physical education curriculum. This past summer when we had the 2019 curriculum released I went through it myself knowing that my teaching assignment was going to be what it is and what I’ve noticed is in addition to all the information in the front matter I would definitely suggest you to have a look at some of the charts at the back. First and foremost it’s at page 299-302 of the Health and Physical Education Curriculum. In that, you’re going to see that when you’re teaching these topics you’re going to see that there’s a curriculum planning chart that gives you that, thanks for the link there. It’s going to give you that context where a lot of these topics that we’re going to talk about today you might see them in your particular teaching assignment but it’s not the first or the last time students are going to be seeing these notions. Something as simple for example, understanding appetites. We’re going to talk a little bit about how we could deconstruct that as a lesson but I really wanted to draw that point about that recursive learning piece because understanding appetite is a key point in– It’s at D 2.2 of our health and education curriculum there and it’s understanding hunger and thirst cues for students at that age but you see it again throughout the curriculum specifically again at the grade six level. Understand that students may come to you depending on what your teaching background is or what level you’re teaching at and they might have seen some of these ideas before. In light of that, I also wanted to take note just to say that when I’m teaching any of these things whether it’s appetite, plate model proportions snacks, or treats, food labeling categorizing foods versus whole foods and ultra-processed foods. I always take a minute to look around the classroom. I read the room who are the students in your room? For example, there may be a real diversity of students within your classroom where there may be some discussion around culturally relevant foods or foods that are relevant to religious or cultural traditions or they may not be and certainly with your experience as an educator you will have to assess the best way to unpack some of these ideas but just to model how I might go about this I wanted to talk about understanding appetite. The first thing I would do is I would look and say, “Okay, what grade am I teaching?” Understanding appetite means that I need to be talking about hunger and fullness cues and there’s a really great food guide tie and there’s a link for you there available from the Government of Canada that gives us some ideas around how we could discuss healthy eating recommendations. If you get in and get a chance to explore that website there are a ton of teaching tools related to all of these teaching ideas and you can just go into their search bar and see some of the ways that you might use some of this science in your classroom. One of the things that’s really nice is that there are some of them have videos integrated some of them have articles or links to other places. There really is a lot that you can that bring into your classroom-based from the government so you know it’s good, accurate information. When we’re talking now about specifically unpacking appetite in a grade one level, I’d be looking at D2.2 it’s a hunger and thirst cues. Sorry, Joyce, I see your question there. Where are the teaching materials being discussed? I’m going to talk about that right now. We’ve got these materials in our curriculum. As I mentioned at page 299 to 302 are where you’ll find the curriculum correlates but these are examples of teaching ideas that we see being recursive throughout the curriculum. Return just to that direct correlate to D2.2. At a grade one level, we might be discussing how we know when we’re feeling hungry versus when we’re feeling thirsty we might talk about dry mouth, we might do that as a large group or a small group brainstorm. When I get into my older students for example, I just taught this recently with grade sixes and we had to apply our recognition of internal hunger and thirst cues and our knowledge of physical factors that influence our desire to eat and drink. That’s directly out of the curriculum. What I did is I looked at a large group discussion format and encourage students to brainstorm the when and why that they eat, then using information often contained in the links that I mentioned there from the government we talked about their stage of development how it might relate to growth spurts level of physical activity. We reflected on the smell and availability of food how that could influence food choices and even how emotional states can impact food choices. What’s really neat is that there’s a lot of different ways for us as teachers to be able to cross-curricularize a lot of these topics. We might be able to pull in aspects of mental health we might be able to pull in aspects from other classes. For example, when we start to teach something like plate model proportions we can do that as a fractions exercise. If you’re in some of the older grades you can do this as a cut and paste exercise designed to function around small motor development. When we’re talking about snacks and treats sometimes there’s really beneficial ways to talk about this between for example, holiday times or time where parents might traditionally send in snacks like birthdays or Halloween. We talk about the difference between a snack being something that we’d have as a smaller portion like vegetables and hummus or nuts, or cheese and crackers whereas a treat would be something that we would have less nutritional value that we might eat more like a dessert. When we talk about food and culture for example, we might have students bring in favorite dishes from their heritage or we might tie it into math and have kids double or triple or half recipes. Really, what’s neat about this is that a lot of these teaching ideas are as an open-ended as you want them to be. We can tie, for example, where food comes from in with geography you can trace food journey from the plate. If you consider local producers we can talk about food processing and animal versus plant-based foods and knowing the difference. Again, I want to tie you back to that food-guide.canada.ca just as a general link because the really is a wealth of information on those topics within their. Through label reading we can talk about it in math in terms of teaching percentages we can talk about it in weights we can talk about volume. That reflects also our sciences in terms of understanding what’s in our food. Is it processed? Is it a whole food? When we talk about media literacy in our English streams we also can talk about food marketing. I hesitate to want to say anything too specifically around this is the one way you can teach this because realistically these topics can be as open-ended as you want them to be and really, you can tie in curriculum from just about any level. In light of all of this, I’d like you to share and apply some ideas because I always think the people in the room you already have a wealth of experience. I’m curious to know based on your teaching experience I’d like you to consider one at least or more of these questions. My first question is how you can reflect these teaching ideas that we just talked about in your classroom at your grade level, if you prefer? My second question would revolve around how you can integrate other subject areas to make these teaching ideas of the cross-curricular lesson? For third, how you can integrate these teaching ideas in your teaching to ensure you’re building a healthy respectful class community? We all have board improvement plans and I think we’ve all spoken in our other PD sessions about the importance of the classroom as the third teacher. I’m looking at how can we build that community piece around really encouraging positive discussion around food. I’d like you to pick at least one of these chat rooms and I’m going to give you about– I think I’ll give you about 90 seconds to consider where you’re going and I’d like an answer. I’m going to give you– Will do this first and then we’ll talk in about five minutes about how you’ve answered these questions. Go ahead, enter a chat room and you can just select whichever room you like. I’m hoping as you’re having an experience in each of the chat rooms here, you’re reading the responses of the other educators here in the room. I’m finding that some of these are ideas that I may have done before but some of these are new ways of thinking about it. I’m grateful for all of you for sharing your expertise in this because I think regardless of what the curriculum is telling us in terms of when and exactly what we must teach we have to be responsive to the needs of the students in the room. I love the way I’m seeing things frame so positively I’m seeing that you’re respecting everybody’s culture and that there is none. There doesn’t seem to be any of that. Those old ideas around good foods or not healthy foods. I see that you’re coming up with ideas that are responsive to the needs of everybody in your classroom which is great, and I love that we’re sharing resources as well like the bright bite program is great. Just to respond to some of these I see chat one seems to just finish up. I’d like to revisit some of those. I love that you’ve got considering using alternate resources that you’re connecting to strands and social justice or family life. That’s great. Discussing having group discussions. I love that you’re being sensitive in terms of student needs integrating these ideas into drama. I love the notion of students coming up with ideas as well. Two, you mentioned kids making their own cereal boxes. That’s really neat too. When we get into chat two when we were asking about how you would use these in cross-curricular I think this is such a great discussion point because it is endless. You’re all right. There’s social studies. I’m seeing mentioning of language arts with media literacy. I see French, art, drama persuasive essay on the benefits of healthy eating. All of these are some really, really good examples of how we can do this. I love Megan, you mentioned the Multicultural Food Festival in chat room three in terms of building that environment. It really is important and I like that piece around the social-emotional learning skills as well because it really does tie back in all the things we’re talking about how we can create that dynamic culture for students where they feel able to share their ideas, and their expertise because certainly some of these students may have expertise within foods or food preparation methods that we might not know ourselves. It really is an opportunity for us as educators to give some knowledge but also get some as well. I love this notion of connecting culture and I’m seeing it mentioned again and again which is so so valuable. In terms of how we can continue doing all of this. I know being an educator like you that oftentimes additional supports in the classroom can be helpful for us. It’s one of those things that you may or may not choose to back up with some grants or opportunities to support your teaching about food and healthy eating. I’d like you to consider that there might be a local farmer or a local producer that could offer you some insight or a visit to your classroom. Oftentimes, the public health unit or your school board contacts can come in and bring extra materials that you may not have access to. Or consider even right now if you would enter in our chatbox who else you could connect with. I wanted to also draw attention to there’s lots of healthy eating grants connected to our healthy school certification and I’ve included the link there on the slide just so you can see– If there are tonnes that are available out there. So certainly there’s money out there. For people that are motivated to go and get it. I know my own school has gotten some support from our whole Kids Foundation, but do visit that will see a link there for some support because it obviously helps to be able to have some money to support some of these things in your classroom. As I mentioned your health units or other people within your school board may be able to help you with that. You can also access these resources. If you’d like to go ahead I’ll give you a moment you think you want to screenshot this slide or refer back after our presentation to the recording of this. These resources also, I use all the time when I’m planning my lessons because I certainly don’t know it all but there’s lots of teaching tools already out there and lots of resources provided by other personnel that can help us. I did want to mention that the content on unlockfood.ca focuses on healthy eating through the life cycle from infants to seniors. Nutrition connections which used to be the Nutrition Resource Centre is a center for nutrition knowledge and collaboration. They can support health professionals community organizations and educators as well. There will be new lesson plans developed for grades one to eight that will reflect Canada’s new food guide as well as the 2019 HP Elementary curriculum. They’re available from the HMP curriculum resources on teaching tools. Ophea.net which we may be familiar with already. Then Ophea ideas for action as well the one I really wanted to mention just because it provides some easy to use activities on the topics of healthy eating mental health and physical activity that you could easily modify for elementary or secondary students. At this point, I’d like to take the time to thank you for having me here today. I’d like to transition back to Kristen just as we finish up our resource session today. -Wonderful. Thank you so much, Robin. We are going to move into our question and answer period. If you have any questions that you’d like to add in the chat we can direct those both Karen, Robin, as we see fit. If we don’t get to all the questions today and we will look to answer those through our follow up blog recap on the webinar. Also, just a reminder that we will be sending out the PDF of the slides after the webinar. And we will be recording today’s webinar. That will be available in November. We’ll just wait for some folks to add in their questions in the chat room and we will look to answer those as they come in. Robin, the first question for you and any ideal time of year for this unit? -To be honest, I find as a teacher that all the time is healthy eating time. I always start my year with that because food is something that we all relate to and it certainly helps if you’ve got a sequel to lunch duty or supervision duty in a particular classroom. I model some of the stuff I talked about in class. I talked about those balance choices and sometimes they see me eat cupcakes because it’s Monday and sometimes they see me eating salad and we talked about that. It’s a really interesting way for students to inquire about what I’m eating and why I’m eating it and I’m lucky I don’t have severe allergies. We talk about a lot of varieties of food and food from other cultures. Where I’m located we live in Northern Ontario. So for us, students don’t often get to see– don’t have to get the chance to see foods from multiple ethnicities in the classroom. So because my family enjoys eating that way we bring in lots of what my students always refer to as you always are eating weird food but it’s a chance for us to really invite students to see what other things look like and be a little bit more exploratory. Because of that, I find that really helps to build my environment so that we can connect more to the human development sexual health stuff, mental health literacy the personal safety stuff. All those pieces falling easier once we’ve had food because food really unifies us. I find it brings us together. -Wonderful. Thank you, Robin. The next question is from Shelley. Cara, I’m wondering if you could answer this one. Do you know if the government is releasing an updated First Nations Food Guide? -Yes, they are supposed to but the date has not been released yet. When they originally released the Food Guide they said that there would be a second part of the food guide with a bit more guidance for hospitals and long term care and schools as well, as a specific food guide for First Nations. We have not seen one yet nor have they made any other announcements as to when that may be available. It’s coming. -Okay, thank you, Kara. I’d also like to put out to the group whoever added in BrightBite to our discussion in the three chat pods if you could just add the link that you used for that program. Tracy is looking for that link. Kara, another one for you. Jacqueline is looking for the picture of the next place with the piece of fish on top of the mic, right? -Yes. Every single picture that I use to create the presentation that’s food guide related is all available to all of you on the Canada’s Food Guide website. There’s a section called resources and it’s just you have to look around for it again the food guide, there’s so much content there but what I can do is get a link to it and just email it and so you’ll have it but it’s right from their website. There’s all the everything, posters and images you can download everything right on the Canada’s Food Guide website it is from there. -Sorry, if I can interrupt there, too. It’s Robin. I just wanted to also add that as teachers we can order up to 100 copies of each of the publications that the government puts out to support our teaching and those supports are available in multiple languages. For example, I just downloaded the Canada’s Food Guide. Well, it’s not a First Nation specific resource. I downloaded it in Ojibwe, so I was able to share that with our NFL teacher as well as parents and I represent that in my classroom as well because I teach students of First Nation ancestry. There are multiple languages that it’s available in even if you’re not teaching students that are speaking English or French first. -Thanks Robin. -If you google Canada’s Food Guide resources you’ll find all the pictures too. -Perfect, thank you. Thank you to those in the chat room who’ve shared some specific links to BrightBites. I would invite those in the chat room to also answer the question around from Robin. How are teachers using the BrightBite program in their classrooms? Robin, I’m wondering have you used this program yourself? -I was introduced to it two, three years ago, actually, at an Ophea conference. One of the reasons why I liked it is because I realized that I have a background in health and physical education so for me the new food guide rather isn’t sort of scary. That said, I noticed the point there’s over 300 pages in this curriculum and the food guide and it is really challenging as a new teacher to sort of know where to look. I would encourage new teachers or teachers not familiar with this context to have a look at BrightBite because what I remember of it it really sort of married all the pieces of nutrition planning and talking around healthy eating. I would also redirect those people as well to check out the Ophea teaching resources because it is certainly a topic that can be huge and it’s only one curriculum of 8 or 10, I believe. It would definitely be whose anyone that’s sort of feeling like they’re struggling to really nail it all down to check out the teaching tools that are available through Ophea because it sort of demystified it but also to check out those dependencies in the curriculum document because it might help with those long range planning pieces. Again, there’s also tools from the Ophea teaching tools website that I use for that. That 299 to 304 is a good sort of snapshot of where the health curriculum is on that and for something more specific than that checking out the Ophea teaching tools as they pertain to healthy eating is also immensely helpful. -Fantastic. Thank you for that answer, Robin. I do know that there are a few folks that are still typing but we are closing in on our time together. We will put our evaluation link in the chat and we’d encourage you to respond to that. As I mentioned any questions we don’t get through today we will be responding within our recap blog and we will be connecting both through the recording and the link to that blog when it’s available in November. I just want to thank you all for your fantastic participation today in the chat rooms in the polls. It’s a really engaging group and I thank you for that. I’d also like to thank our presenter, Cara and Robin thank you for bringing your knowledge and for the discussion today. I had a great time learning and I hope you did too and thank you.

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