Email Marketing | Best Practices for Bands

Email Marketing | Best Practices for Bands


so as an artist gets into email marketing
more they may be looking online for different
best practices for email is there anything that you recommend in
terms of best practices so it’s an interesting
problem I think that we see this with email marketing at ReverbNation ourselves
that every list and every group of customers is different and everybody’s unique, and so you can read
all the papers you want on how to do marketing tactics but at the end of the day what works for your fan base works
for your fan base, and the only way to really figure that out is through experimentation and I
think that’s a difficult reality for some artists to understand because they
want the answer they want to know what the right thing
to do is, and really the right thing to do is to commit to experimenting, to commit
email marketing, to commit to engaging your fans actually talking to
them, and I think that if you commit to that you’ll be rewarded. As artists start to practice email marketing more how can
they tell if they’re succeeding? So one of the big things, I think is
important about email is your open rate and your click through rate.
These are the big numbers, how many people if you sent to a hundred people, how
many open that email, and how many actually end up clicking on it. And these numbers are imperfect, the
way there measured there’s a lot of technical implications,
but it’s something. I think if you pay attention to those numbers, and track
them over time you can see if you’re getting better and I think every band needs to be
committed to that experimentation and committed to trying new things with
email and by tracking their open rates and their
click-through rates they can tell if they’re getting better or if they’re stagnant, and I think that’s
really the way you can kinda improve your craft, and improve the
messaging around your band. So tell me a little bit more about how
people can experiment with their actual audience that they’re
sending emails to. So most bands send an email to their entire
list and for a lot of pieces of content that’s
actually a great idea if you have a new album or a new song,
tell everybody about it. I think that’s one of the great things about
this new digital world is you don’t have to be in any sort of geography in
order to consume a song, or video, or something like that. With shows it’s a little different, so
you can use segmentation of your list to target information about a show to just
people that live near that show. If your fans are in Miami, and you’re playing a
show in Seattle it doesn’t make a lot of sense to send your
Miami fans a show announcement because they’re probably not
gonna be able to be there, but what would make sense is after the show sending your entire list a detailed
summary, of how the show went and what happened and what the reaction was and
stuff like that, and bring them into that bring them into that tour and bring them
into your world a little bit, and so i think that for a lot of pieces the content
sending to your whole list is actually fine. For certain specific cases,
segmentation does make sense, and a lot of it’s around touring.

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