Email Marketing | Managing and Experimenting with Email Marketing Campaigns

Email Marketing | Managing and Experimenting with Email Marketing Campaigns


how would an artist just starting out
use email differently from an artist who has millions of fans? I don’t
think it’s the age you know how long you’ve been a band that
matters, it’s more the size – how big your list is, right? and if
you’re just starting out and you have a relatively small list you need to use a lot more of the
authentic tactics that I talked about. And if you have a much bigger list, a more established artist, I’d still recommend that you use some of those tactics and you see this with bigger artists, but at that point it’s appropriate to
start asking for your fans to give back, to buy your
music, to buy tickets to a show to engage with you on a deeper level and
I think that you know where that point is where you
stop sort of just trying to engage that fan base and start trying to make a business
out of your music is different for every artist and
different for how they feel about their music and what their goals are. And for bands whose goals are to be famous, goals are to gain recognition that might be different from a band who’s
looking for financial success and so that might move the time line of
where you want to you know, use email marketing for sales tactics earlier or later in the
lifetime of your band. Do you think a band ever reaches a point
where they can no longer manage email themselves and at that point do you think it makes
sense for somebody else to handle it for them? Yeah definitely. I think you know we see
this as as a company we have millions of artists
and we use email marketing in a variety of different ways. And you do need someone who knows email
marking when your lists get really really big. Things start to
become really important around segmentation, time of day, and you
know whether or not that email list and email fits in with the rest of your
brand. And for smaller bands they’re usually pretty much in control of that. Right? They’re designing their
own album covers or working with someone to get them designed, They’re writing
their own songs, they’re planning their own show tours and so it makes sense for them to control
your email marketing. When those bands kind of graduate and
their lists get really really big in the hundreds of thousands, then it really becomes appropriate to
have someone who’s a little bit more professional help them manage, manage it because at that point they
should be focusing on growing their career and you know some the other parts around
being a band and probably leave some of the digital
marketing stuff up to a professional. But, I think at the early stages it really
makes sense for bands to to directly communicate with their fans
and manage their own email lists. So, for musicians who are just
starting out and still managing their email themselves, how much time should they be spending on
it relatively speaking in terms of doing their other marketing promotions,
social media, should email marketing take
precedence over other things? So that’s definitely different for every band.
Some bands are a little bit more focused on marketing, some bands are a little bit more focused on
touring, a little bit more focused on creating the music. That’s really a function of what your goals are
as a band or as a musician, and I think what’s really important is not exactly
how much time should spend on these things, but to make sure you do a little bit of all
of them. Right? So I don’t think you can ignore email marketing, you can’t ignore social
media marketing, you can’t ignore writing your music and actually crafting
what people are going to consume. And so, I don’t think there’s a
prescription that says: you should spend thirty percent of your time on email marketing 30 percent on social media marketing.
What I think is important is that you know, every week you spend a little bit of time on both. And
if you have more time and you can do it sort of on a daily basis, I think that’s
great. But, I think that you know on a
weekly basis at least thinking about it, even if you decide I don’t have anything that I want to say
to my fans through email this week. that’s fine, but I think if a week goes by
and you haven’t even thought about email marketing, that’s too much.

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