Sandbulte Center for Ethical Leadership Speaker Series: Jessica Stauber

Sandbulte Center for Ethical Leadership Speaker Series: Jessica Stauber


– Welcome to the
Leadership Speaker Series. This event is sponsored by the Sandbulte Center for Leadership in the School of Business and Technology. The Center was created through
a gift from Minnesota Power to honor its retiring chairman
and CEO, Mr. Sandy Sandbulte. I’m pleased to introduce our
speaker, Jessica Stauber. Jessica graduated from the
University of Wisconsin, Madison with degrees in journalism
and political science. She worked as a TV reporter and anchor in Duluth and then Green Bay. She moved back to Duluth and began working at St. Luke’s Hospital as a public relations specialist. After a four-year stint at St. Luke’s, she moved to Westmoreland Flint as an account manager and copy writer. She moved up the ranks there through her 12 years at the agency. She left the role of vice
president to return to St. Luke’s to serve in her current role as director of marketing
and business planning. She’s proud to say she’s a Saint. She graduated from CSS with
an MBA in rural healthcare this past December. She and her husband have four kids and they love living
and working in Duluth. She serves on the board of
the Duluth Chamber of Commerce and on the downtown council board. Jessica, welcome, and thanks for speaking to our group. – Thank you very much.
(audience applauding) Well, it’s good to be here today. Thank you for that introduction. I should also mention I’m on
the Visit Duluth board as well. So I call it the trifecta of boards. I feel very privileged to
be on all three of them. The group gives me a really
good cross section of Duluth. Keeps me quite busy, but it’s enjoyable. So when Rick asked me to present, I was at first honored. And then my first question was how many students are
required to be here today? Looking at this class list, there’s five different
classes here, which is great. So raise your hand if you’re
required to be here today. Okay, most of the room. How many people are covering
more than one class today? That’s pretty good, huh?
(laughing) So whether you’re required to be here or are here on your own accord, I’m glad that you’re here because it would be really awkward if I was just talking to Rick alone here. But seriously, I’m glad you’re here because I love when I get a
chance to talk to young adults and share some insights and do what I think it takes
to be a great employee. I thought a lot about what
I wanted to share today, and that’s the subject that I landed on. So as you’re gearing up to head off to your internship this summer, or maybe you’re graduating in May and going to be starting on your new job, I’m hoping that I can share
some thoughts on what I think, and this is just me, what I think it takes to
make a great employee. There are some qualities that
maybe you already possess and you wanna continue to cultivate, or maybe it’s some qualities
that I’ll bring up today that you maybe don’t have as
strongly in your repertoire, and you’ll want to grow those. Or maybe you’ll think all
of my advice is hogwash and you don’t wanna take any of it, which is completely up to you. But I hope I do have some wisdom that will be helpful to
you in the coming year or maybe five or ten years down the road. Now, some of you may be
planning to be entrepreneurs, which is great. You’ll likely be an employee first before you start your own business. Or if you are going straight
into your own business, maybe my insights will help you as you look to hire
employees to work for you. So, Richard, a little bit about me. I’m gonna share a few
more things about me. I’m in the middle of six kids, the third of six. Isn’t that a great picture? I am married to Bill. He is a Duluth police officer. We just celebrated our 20th anniversary January 23rd. We have four children as Rick mentioned. The oldest is 19, the youngest is 11. I’m auntie to a lot of nieces and nephews. This is my side of the family. My parents celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary last year. And these are their 20 grandchildren. I’m a hard worker. I am far from perfect. But I’m happy with where I am and I’m always looking to
improve as an individual and as a professional. So, again, my tips on what it takes
to be a great employee. And why should you care
about being a great employee? Well, it can certainly
help you get the job. Because if you are applying for a job and they call your former
employer for a reference and they’re asking what
type of employee are you and they say, “Meh.” Well, that’s not gonna help you very much. But the great employees are the ones who get the lucky breaks, the ones who get promoted, the ones who have somebody
take them under their wing and mentor them. Great employees are more satisfied at work because they’re more successful. And being successful is fun, and it’s also financially rewarding. So, again, I’ve put
together my top 10 tips for what it takes to
make a great employee, and I’ll walk through them, and then we’ll have time
at the end for questions. So the first one is to
prepare yourself for the job. As Rick mentioned, I majored in journalism and
political science in college. I wanted to be a television news reporter. And I knew it was a
highly competitive field where I had to work hard to prepare myself to get that door opened so I could actually get my
first job in that industry. So journalism was my primary major, but I had an opportunity
to get a double major, so I chose political science knowing that would help set
me up for being a journalist. I volunteered to write
for the school paper, The Daily Cardinal. I took a part-time job at
Wisconsin Public Television just to be around a floor crew, helping to set the lights
and run the camera. Has anyone ever heard of
Sewing With Nancy on PBS? Anybody? Oh, there we go. So I worked on the floor
crew at Sewing With Nancy. I interned at WKOW
Channel 27 TV in Madison between my junior and
senior year of college. I would do whatever I could to just be helpful in the newsroom, helping the photographers
edit video, going on stories, whatever I could do to be helpful and gain some meaningful experience. Then I graduated and I
interned at Channel 27 again because I didn’t have a job. I knew I needed to stay
involved in the industry, so I continued to
volunteer at the TV station until that fall when I was hired part-time as a producer and reporter. And as I was preparing for
this, I was thinking I should pull up that video of
my first time on air. I had this terrified look on my face. But I’ll spare you that. My first full-time job, then, was about six months after
I graduated from college at KDLH TV Channel 3 in Duluth. I was a reporter. I started January 1st of 1995. I always say I worked for Channel 3 back when Channel 3 was separate, when Channel 3 was Channel 3. Where the new Maurices Tower stands is where the old Channel
3 that I worked at was at. And I had worked really, really
hard to get to that point, in my life, to get to
that first full-time job in my dream industry. And I wanna throw out a question. Any guesses about how much
I made that first year? – 20K. – 20? That’s generous.
(laughing) 15. $15,000. So, yeah, it’s a tough
industry to break into for very little money. Anyway. As you think about preparing
yourself for your future job, I really want to underscore the importance of having an internship. I know that one of the classes is working with the Lincoln Park Business District on some marketing plans, which is awesome. Any real word experience you
can get is really important. When I’m hiring somebody, if I’m looking at a
recent college graduate, I really won’t look at somebody
who hasn’t had an internship because I don’t wanna be the
one who has to train them into working in a
professional environment. I want them to know
how to act in meetings, how meetings go, how to
dress, and that sort of thing. If I’m hiring somebody who hasn’t had that internship experience, I’m the one who has to teach them that for the first several
weeks or months on the job. So, really, that’s one of
my top pieces of advice to any college student I
get the chance to talk to, is get an internship. So think about what the
job is that you want and what are you doing to
prepare yourself right now, what more can you do. Determine what that is
and then make a plan for how you’re going
to get that experience. My second tip is to be
committed to growth. So I’ve hired quite a few
people over the years, and during the interview process, one quality that I’m always looking for is people who want to grow. Specifically, I’m looking for people who recognize that they need to grow and are open to feedback. Because I have a vision
for my team at St. Luke’s where we support the mission of St. Luke’s which is the patient above all else. And we as a department
have to use our resources, which are people power, there’s myself and sixteen members. And then our financial resources which are to buy advertising, to
work with outside partners, and that sort of thing. We need to use those resources
to have the maximum impact to benefit St. Luke’s to
get all of our messages. So when I’m doing that, I want to make sure that
everybody who’s joining this team shares that vision, shares that mission, and knows that they can continue to grow and need to continue to grow to become the best possible
team that we can be. So I’m not going to hire a
person in the interview process that can’t convince me that they have bought into this mission and that they are open to feedback and really truly wanting
to grow as an individual through their time at the job. It often is really hard
to start a new job. There’s a lot of excitement and nerves. And I’ve noticed that
people tend to get sick when they start a new job, if it’s in the cold and
flu season, especially. You’re just worn down because
of the stress of it all. So it’s sometimes hard to
get off to a good start on a new job. And if I have had that
conversation with the employee ahead of time as part of
the interview process, and they told me that
they’re open to feedback, then I’ve made a commitment, myself, to give them that feedback. So if we get off on a not-so-great start, I’m gonna sit down with them
one-on-one and talk about that. And their reaction is everything. They made a commitment to
me that they want feedback. I’ve made a commitment to
give them that feedback so they can grow. And that’s a really powerful conversation that in my experience has gone really well and has helped that
employee feel more engaged with the mission and help them become a
bigger part of the team. Whereas if I go to that employee who said that they wanted that feedback, and they have all these excuses, are feeling defensive, then it’s a different result. I’m gonna say, okay, that person doesn’t want my help to grow as a person and as a professional. So I’m not going to invest my
time in that person anymore. And that will be probably
the beginning of the end. So how are you committed to growth? You can go to a daylong seminar, watch a TED Talk, or read industry magazines, go back to school for your MBA at the College of Saint Scholastica. That’s what I did. As Rick mentioned, I graduated
just this past December. It is nice. I remember the feeling
from when I graduated from college way back, of how good that feeling was when you didn’t have homework
hanging over your head all the time. And I re-experienced
that the past few months, having much more free time. So anyway, I’m committed
to growth as an individual and I think that’s a great quality for every employee to have. The next tip is to be humble. It’s not uncommon for young
professionals to know it all. And I appreciate young confidence. But it can also come off
as young over-confidence. So I would just in general
say listen more than you talk. And a way to think about this, too, might be to ask a few questions. And do you have a friend
who’s constantly bragging about what they have or
what brands they’re wearing? Do you have a friend who knows
the answer to every question? Or somebody who answers the question even before it’s out of your mouth? Where you just know that
they did not even think about what their answer was going to be? That’s what I call a
little bit over-confidence. And just think about
how can you listen more and benefit from the experience
of those who are around you. Tip number four is to take pride in your work. So even though the task may
seem small or unimportant, take pride in that task
and do your best work. So for example, I once had an employee that I asked to write a press release. It was a pretty
straightforward press release. But when she gave it to me she said, “I drafted this really quickly,
so please clean it up.” And what I interpreted that as was this is a menial task that’s below me and I don’t wanna do it, so you do the dirty work. How does that make me feel as a manager? Chris is shaking his head. You’re right, not good. It was a simple task. The thing is, it’s just
a really simple example of not taking pride in your work. When I’m interviewing or
working with an intern, I underscore how important it is to take time to craft even an email, a simple email, that could be something
really basic sent to me. If they don’t have punctuation in it, if they don’t sign off on it, if they’re abbreviating words, again, it’s small things. But everything that you do, especially when you’re
new to an organization as an intern or as an employee, is a reflection. It’s building up that
perception of who you are as an individual. So make everything, especially in those initial stages, your best work. Because that is going to help you be recognized as somebody
who takes pride in your work, somebody they can trust
to do more and more and give more and more responsibility to. Because if I have an intern or an employee that can’t
send me a decent email, how can I trust them to
send an email to a client? Another example would be an intern who’s asked to make list of area hotels to deliver urgent care rack cards to. So that intern could go online, make a list and put it into a
Word doc and email it to me, and that would be doing what I asked. But what if that intern instead did that same first step but put it into a spreadsheet with some more detail about how many rooms the hotel had and formatted it in a way
that would make it really easy to print labels from that spreadsheet? What if she had actually called the hotels to let them know that the rack cards, we were gonna be delivering these, and asked if they would be
interested to kind of do that so that when they arrived they would be more receptive to them? Or even if she offered, I can go ahead and do the mailing, or I can hand-deliver the rack cards. What if she offered to
check in with the hotels three or four weeks later
to see how they were going? So I share some examples just to help you start
thinking as young professionals how can you go above and beyond, how can you take pride in your work. Because that’s gonna make an impression. Because the person next to you might not be doing that. The person next to you might be doing exactly what they were told. And I’m not saying to go above
and beyond and waste time, but it shows that you’re
taking this little task and you’re thinking. You’re not just doing
exactly what you’re told. You’re thinking about how can
I be as helpful as possible. And that really, for me, as a manager, goes a long way. So how many of you have a job right now? Any sort of job? Okay, so a lot of you are working. So what is anything would
you have done differently, again, if anything, would you have done differently or had done better if you had
taken more pride in your work? I just want you to think
about that for a minute. Was there an assignment or
a task that you were given or maybe part of your regular duties that you do every time you work? What could you have done differently to show more pride in your work? And think about doing that the next time. The next tip is to love what you do. I’ll go back briefly to my beginning. I was born in Amery, Wisconsin. I don’t think Rick said this. I’m from Hayward, Wisconsin. I’m a Wisconsinate through and through. My parents were living in Amery
with my two older siblings when I was born. He was going to summer
school at UW River Falls because he had gone to undergrad to be an agricultural education teacher. Started doing that and realized that wasn’t what he loved to do. So he decided to go into tech ed teaching. He loved teaching, but not
the agricultural part of it. So he was going back for his master’s. He had gotten a tech ed job and had to get his master’s fairly quickly to make it happen. So even though he was
raising a young family, having a third child, he didn’t love what he did so he changed his course a little bit. So my message here is to love what you do. Because you can’t be a great employee if you don’t love what you do. If you’re doing a task every day, maybe at St. Luke’s
you’re working in a role. Rick and I were talking about most patients are happy, but
not every patient is happy. So if you’re in role
where you’re dealing with patient complaints all day and you can’t stand that, well, that’s not the job for you. You’re never gonna be good
at a job that you don’t love. So I’m not saying quit on day one if it’s
not what you expected. You need to give jobs a chance. But thinking about your life, you need to love what you do. And if you love what
you’ll do, what you do, it’ll be really easy
to be a great employee. All right, I’m gonna take
a quick stretch break for all of us. So everybody stand up. (laughing) We’re through tip number five, so we’re gonna take a quick stretch break. We’re gonna start with a neck roll. Just roll your neck nice and slow, one way. Does this feel good? Anybody hear any cracking? (laughs) Any cracking that’s alarming? (laughing) All right, now we’re gonna reach high. Reach high. My shirt’s gonna go up here, but reach up, and then stretch your back out there. All right, arms across the body. Let’s do this one. Come and get that stretch through here. (audience chattering) All right, now let’s arch our back, kinda reestablish that
curve that tends to go away as we are hunched over our desks all day. That feels good, huh? All right, and then the last we’ll do is just rotate your ankles one at a time. Don’t try to do both at one time. Lift your foot and rotate your ankle. (audience chattering and laughing) All right, thank you. (audience chattering) All right. Thank you very much for
that little stretch break. That felt good for me. Hopefully it did for you as well. Tip number six is to
have a strong work ethic. So I had an employee
who texted me one year when I was on Christmas vacation. And he was still working and he texted me early in the morning. And he said that his
daughter’s day care was closed because we had gotten a lot of snow. So he was asking me, he was planning to work
from home that day, if that was okay. And I had been sleeping
when the text came in and was still a little groggy
as I thought about that. But all I could think of was how could you work from home if you’re babysitting a toddler? It just didn’t seem right to me. Know that I would have
immediately said yes if he said, “Can I take the day off
to care for my child?” Absolutely. Absolutely no problem there. But what I was really bothered with was kind of the nerve,
I guess you could say, of him asking me to work from home because he had to watch his toddler. And I didn’t feel like that
was a fair question to me. Because what sort of
precedent does that set? I could monitor email with a toddler. I have four kids, so I know what it’s like
to have a toddler at home. I could monitor email, but that’s not really working. So I just think that’s a good example that work ethic really wasn’t there. We had a conversation
about it after the fact. I felt bad that I had to say no, but there’s no way I could’ve said yes because it’s not fair to the organization. It’s not fair to our employer. So when I got back to
work we had a conversation and he totally understood. But I share that as an example where on the surface it might seem like, oh, that’s fine. Why wouldn’t you let him stay home? Because it’s not right. It’s not that strong work
ethic that I’m looking for. I have a teenage daughter
who seems to not feel well on a fairly regular basis. (chuckles) She doesn’t wanna go
to school on most days. But 95% of the time I
make her go to school. Because she’s usually tired because maybe she was just
up late the night before, or she’s not ready for a test. But it’s not like she’s sick. She just doesn’t wanna kinda
get up and face the day. So I think we can all relate to that. But the question is, when those days hit, how do we handle them? How do you as an individual handle that? Are you going to lay in bed? Or are you going to have
the work ethic to get up and show up for work and do your best? We may not feel 100% every day, but if we get in the habit of missing school on a regular basis or calling in sick to
work on a regular basis, we’re not setting ourselves
up to be successful employees. There are days when I
don’t wanna go to work. I think about what’s on my calendar and I would rather just roll over and cover my head and go back to sleep. But those days, if you do that, that’s going to lead to less success in your life. You need to get up and
face those hard days. Because that’s what builds character and that builds your work ethic. If staying home is always an option because you created that
option in your life, you’re not going to be a great employee. So you need to eliminate that option and adjust your plans accordingly. So if you know that staying
at home is not an option, even when you stayed out
too late the night before, you will hopefully change your plans and just simply not stay out
too late the night before. But even if you did stay out
too late the night before, you still have to go to work. Because you made a commitment
to your employer to be there. And staying out too late
the night before is not a good habit or a good
reason to not go to work. So I’m gonna share a
little bit of an example for how having a strong work
ethic paid off in my life. When I went to orientation in Madison the summer before my freshman year, it was in June, and they had activities there. And I think a lot of colleges have those where it’s a chance to learn
about the different groups and organizations that you can
join when you get to campus, and give you a sense to start thinking about might I wanna join. So as I was walking around, somebody came up to me and
asked if I played an instrument. I said, well, yes, in fact, I did. I played the flute. I was in the band in Hayward High School. We marched in the Musky Festival Parade, big things like that.
(chuckling) And had started in fifth grade and played all the way through my senior year of high school. So he talked about the
marching band at Wisconsin which I had no idea about any of it. And he said that it’s the most amazing
experience you could ever have, but we don’t have flutes in the band. So he suggested that I take up saxophone because the fingers are the same. Of course, the mouth is totally different, but the fingers are the same when you’re making the different notes. He also didn’t tell me that saxophones, there’s only 16 saxophone
players in the band as opposed to trumpets and trombones which are 50, 60, 70 of each of those. So anyway, I was sold. My roommate and I showed up
for marching band practice that first day, the week
before school starts, in the orientation week, and had no idea what we were getting into. We arrived at Camp Randall. It was a hot day. And we figured it would just be a get to know the band sort of thing, like talk to us about what to expect. But it was not. (chuckles) It was anything but that. We realized that signing
up for the marching band was more like signing up for the military. I’m not exaggerating. We had two-a-day
practices two hours a day. People screaming in our faces to try to get down the high step march that Wisconsin is known for. It would’ve been really easy to quit. Super hot, people screaming at you. I don’t know if I can do this, but I’m not going to quit. So as hard as the marching was, I was dreading even more
the one-on-one audition. So Mike Leckrone is the
band director at Wisconsin. And he’s graduating this spring after 50 years in that role. But he was a legend back then when I was there many years ago. And I was dreading going in
for my one-on-one audition because I had not a
mastery of the saxophone. So I’m sitting there waiting for him to come into the practice room. And, of course, every bone in my body wanted to get up and get out of there. But I was committed. I had made a commitment to try out for the marching band and see if I can make it. So he put down the music and I quickly explained I don’t really play the saxophone, I play the flute. So he just kind of grunted at me and said, “Well, let’s see what you’ve got.” So I mustered my way through it. And he said, “Well, I
can tell you read music.” “So you’re fine.” He said, “You’re gonna play
every day and practice.” Practice was five days a week. “So I know you’ll get the hang of it.” So I had gotten through
that audition, at least. The next day they posted the list for who made the marching band. And my name was on the list. I was an alternate, so I
didn’t have my own spot yet. But I knew I could prove myself over time, continue to get better, have the right work ethic to earn a spot. So then that next week when the band was set, Mike spoke to us freshmen and said, “You freshmen are in
for something special.” Because Barry Alvarez had
just become the head coach at Wisconsin. And Wisconsin football
had been in the tanks for a long time. In fact, the chant used to
be “we came to see the band” because the football team was so bad that people would cheer,
“We came to see the band.” So fast forward to my
senior year of college, and the football team
made it to the Rose Bowl. Back then it was the
top team in the Big Ten versus the top team in the Pac-10. And Wisconsin had made it there after a 30-year break. It had been 1965 since
they had last been there. So the Rose Bowl is legendary. It’s the oldest bowl game in the country. We got to march in the Rose Bowl Parade. We won the game in exciting fashion. Very close game. So if hadn’t had the work ethic
to stick out that hard time. It really shaped my college experience, the marching band. You go to all the home football games. Turns into the pep band, so you get to go to all the hockey games and basketball games. It shaped a huge part of
my college experience. And if I hadn’t had the
work ethic to stick it out, I would’ve missed out on all of that. So a question to reflect on is do you have a strong work ethic? Have you ever quit
something and regretted it? The next time things get tough, are you going to give up? Or are you going to persevere? The next tip is to stay
focused on your goals. So like all of you, I
wanted to go to college. And being from a family of six kids, I knew that my dad was a teacher, my mom was a homemaker. I knew that they couldn’t provide me with robust financial support. But they did provide me with
an incredible work ethic and taught me to set goals
and work hard to achieve them. So I saved from the day
I was old enough to save. My grandma would give
us $5 for our birthday and we’d dutifully stick it in the bank and my grandma would be upset. But that helped me pay
for my college education. Starbucks wasn’t a thing
when I was your age. But now it’s a thing. And my daughter who’s 17
is there way too much. And Qdoba. Those dollars are going out the door. She’s not getting closer to
her dream of going to college when she’s doing that. So as you think about that, what are you doing to stay
focused on your goals? Are there habits that you have that are bringing you
away from your goals? And if so, I invite you to consider the thought of changing them. So the next tip, create good habits. Have any of you ever
heard of Matthew Kelly? He’s a Catholic speaker from Australia. Nobody? Well, hopefully you’ll see his name in the next week or so and you’ll listen to his presentation or read one of his books. He’s really dynamic. So, again, he’s from
Australia, has a great accent, but more importantly has
a really great message. And a big theme that runs
through his presentations is about creating the life that you want. And you do that by creating the habits that lead to the life you want. So it’s a little hard to
identify a person’s habits when you’re interviewing them, and whether their habits are good or bad. But there are some cues
that can be picked up. So if your habit is always running late or frequently calling into work sick or taking longer lunches than you should or gossiping about coworkers and friends or working half-heartedly on Fridays because you’re more focused
on your weekend plans or spending more time texting during the work day than you should when you should be maybe
cleaning if there’s no customers, but instead you’re texting or watching Netflix on your phone. Those habits will lead to
a certain type of life. Maybe you’ll have some
instant gratification, but are those habits getting you closer to the life that you want? That life may likely be the one that doesn’t lead to those lucky breaks. It seems that others are always getting the promotions that you wanted. Or your friends don’t
seem like true friends because you just know
they’re talking about you behind their back or behind your back. And you’ll be stuck at a dead-end job. So what are your habits? Matthew says, “If you tell
me what your habits are,” “I’ll tell you what your life is like.” When I heard that, I thought, oh, okay, I have some good habits, right? So I thought of those good habits and then I thought about
the bad habits that I had. And I think that’s a good question for all of us to reflect on. What are our good habits? What are our bad habits? And which ones are we willing to change to become closer to creating
the life that we want? Tip number nine is to be
a person of integrity. So there are some things
that cannot be learned, I don’t think. They’re just part of who you are. And when I’m hiring I’m
looking for a good person and looking for a person of integrity. My daughter is in fifth grade, but as a fourth grader last year she learned about integrity in school. And she came home and she said, “Mom, do you know what integrity is?” I said, “What?” And she said, “It’s
doing the right thing.” “Even when no one is looking.” And I think that’s a really
good definition of integrity. So I hire good people. I try to hire good people, people who are made of the right
stuff and have good hearts. And I know they’ll be
incredible employees. I am not gonna hire an engineering major to work in a writing role. But I will hire an English major who has the right heart
that I’m looking for, even if they don’t have
the exact experience I’m looking for. I did that once. I hired for skill and kind of set aside what I thought was maybe some personality issues. But she was really smart and really skilled in marketing. And that was the biggest
hiring mistake I ever made. Because she didn’t have a good heart. So be a person of integrity. I once hired a person who lived about an hour away from Duluth. She had been working at
another company in Duluth and commuting. So I knew she was
comfortable with the commute and was adjusted to it, which was good. But during the interview
she offered to me that, “My family and I will be moving
to Duluth within the year.” She convinced me. And it wasn’t a condition
of her employment, but she made that commitment to me. She openly made that commitment to me. So I took her at her word. I thought she was a person of integrity. So several months had gone by. It might have even been
getting close to the year mark. And I don’t remember how it came up, but she casually just
threw out in the office, “Oh, yeah, I’m not moving to Duluth.” And she just kinda went
along with her day. And maybe you’re thinking,
what’s the big deal? But for me, it was a really big deal. She had made a commitment to me. And she just disregarded
it like it was no big deal. When I make a commitment, I’m a person of integrity. So when I make a commitment, I’m going to follow through on that. And I understand that things change. So I would have totally
understood and respected if she had come to me and said, Jessica, can we talk? I wanna talk about this
commitment that I made to you about moving to Duluth. My family situation has changed. I don’t think it’s gonna
be best for us anymore. I’m sorry. I hope you understand. That would’ve been just fine. I would’ve understood. But when she threw away a promise like she was throwing away a piece of gum, that told me a lot about who she was. That’s not a person of integrity, in my opinion. So another element of integrity
is to always tell the truth. There’s times when we
don’t wanna tell the truth. Maybe we broke something at work. Maybe we were out, we overslept. We don’t wanna admit that to our boss. But always tell the truth. It’s a really simple rule
to live your life by. Just always tell the truth. My husband sometimes will say to our kids, why are you lying when the
truth would fit in better? Just tell the truth. If we just always tell the truth, it makes our life a lot simpler. I was talking about this presentation with a few friends of mine. And one of them shared a quote that she has posted at her desk that says, “Integrity is not a 90% thing.” “It’s not a 95% thing.” “Either you have it or you don’t.” That’s from Peter Scotese. So make sure you have it. Be a person of integrity. Always do the right thing. And tip number ten is to be true to yourself. If you’re working for a company whose mission you can’t get behind or has morals that are
different from your own, you will never be a great
employee at that company. And that’s okay. Even if you’re working for a good company, sometimes they may ask you to do something that doesn’t align with
what you believe in or what your morals are. This is a small example, but I just share it because it taught me a lot about myself and how to handle situations where I’m
asked to do something, but what I’m asked to do is not really what I’ve discovered. So I’ll share this example. So when I first moved to Green Bay to work for the CBS affiliate there, one of the first stories I was assigned to was to do a story on like
an expose sort of thing on how grocery stores are set up, how they’re set up to deceive
you into buying more food. My producer had seen this
story done on another market, and so she decided, here, I
want you to do this story. So I set up the interview
with the grocery store manager and did the interview. And he explained, well, we set up the grocery
store like this because I remember one of the things was we group things together
so that for busy families, we group the meat next to the spaghetti
sauce next to the noodles so that you can just kinda
come here and grab it and go. But I tried to do this
story the expose story. I tried to twist things around and do the story that
they wanted me to do. But that wasn’t right. That wasn’t what I had found. I was manipulating the interviews to get the story that
they wanted me to do. I wasn’t true to myself. So I share that because regularly, as I’m working with my team, one of my colleagues was
working on a story recently and I said, well, this is how I think we want this story to be. But as you’re doing the interviews, let the story shape itself. Don’t force it. So have enough confidence. And hopefully you’ll work for a company that wants you to do the right thing and gives you that freedom to not just do the story,
do what you’re told, but to do what’s real. If you ever work for an organization that you don’t believe in, it can be really tough. And know who you are as an individual. Know what your morals are. Know what you stand for. And if it’s not a good values fit for you, it’s okay to move on. So that’s my list of tips. Thank you for listening. If anybody has any questions, I’d be happy to try to answer them. (audience applauding) – Questions? – Does anybody get extra credit
if they ask a good question? (laughing) Oh, apparently you do. I see a teacher’s head nodding. – What’s the hardest part of your job? – The hardest part of my job. – And the most rewarding? – Well, the most rewarding part of my job and the reason I came back to St. Luke’s because I had been there, left for 12 years, and came back. I don’t save lives. I don’t operate on people. I don’t prescribe important medications. But I can tell people in our region about the great care
that St. Luke’s provides. So it’s a real privilege
to be in that position and to help all of you consumers see what St. Luke’s has to offer, and help you make a choice
to choose St. Luke’s for your health care. So that’s the most rewarding. Building my team over the last five years has been rewarding as well. And, again, as I mentioned earlier, that vision and mission that
we have for our department to support St. Luke’s. The hardest part is probably just there’s just so much to do. There’s always lots of people
who want your expertise, who want their project or initiative to be the most important one. And to really staying focused
on what’s most important and to align our resources accordingly. It’s hard to say no when you want to help everybody and every program at St. Luke’s is good. So just prioritizing and
not trying to do too much. Yes? – Before you get your career path rolling, do you suggest having multiple internships
throughout the years and different jobs? Or sticking through with just one for a certain amount of time? Do you wanna play the field or do you wanna stay in one? – That’s a good question. I think it would depend on if you’re with a company
that you’re interning with and you feel like if you return there to
intern you had more to learn, then I think that could be a good choice. But I would probably lean more towards getting a different internship in like your second summer, for example. Because you will learn, you’ll get a better sense of how a different culture operates. Every company, I’m sure you’ve talked
about this in your classes, has a culture. And you’ll get a better sense for how different companies’ cultures work and different structures. This company does things this way, this company does things that way. And it gives you just
a broader experience. Yes? – What made you switch fields? – Good question. It was a really tough
decision in a lot of ways. But I got engaged to my husband who was living in Duluth. And he was absolutely
willing to move to Green Bay. But I decided that I thought I’d be in
broadcast journalism forever, and four years into my career, I did a lot of soul searching and realized what was most important for me which was having an 8-5 job, not an 11PM job or a weekend job or an early morning job. Having more predictable hours and being closer to my family. Many of them still live in Hayward. So I vividly remember crying. But it was like a cleansing, and I’ve never regretted it, ever. It’s been a wonderful career change. And I’m very fortunate in that I’ve always been able to look forward and never look back and regret. Yes? – So you talked about
being a good employee. Is there any tips you have for being a good applicant to a job? Or is there anything that
really stands out to you looking for people to hire as an intern or as another employee? – Yeah. A fresh example is that I just got an email from an acquaintance from an acquaintance, and it was a mom looking for
an internship for her daughter. That doesn’t strike me
really positively. (chuckles) I’m sure you’ve heard about this. Just a cover letter with a typo in it. A cover letter that is poorly written drives me nuts. I think this internship or this job will be really good for me because it would give me great experience. I appreciate that. An internship should
be good for the intern. But think about it from
the employer standpoint. What do you have to offer that employer? What experience do you have? What abilities do you
have that you can offer? So make sure you’re not
making it all about you. That’s a pretty common mistake I see in cover letters for internships. Like I said, I’m not trying to say I don’t care about you as an individual. And no company should ever
do an internship program if they’re not committed
to helping that student learn and grow, but it should be a mutually
beneficial experience. And it doesn’t hurt to know somebody. Just using that example. There’s fewer and fewer
applicants in general, so it’s easier to stand out. But in the past, 10 years ago when I would get lots of applications for a job, it would be really which one rises to the top? If you have a friend who says, “Oh, check out so and so’s resume.” Then I would. It helps draw some
attention to that resume versus that just getting
lost in the crowd of resumes. Yes? – How much intern experience
do you generally require when you’re considering a job application? – I would say three months would be great. It doesn’t need to be
six months or a year. It needs to be enough that it shows me that you recognize that you needed that
professional experience to hone your skills more, to go from the classroom learning to the real world learning. So I think three months would be great. Yes? – You talked about
reflecting on your habits, good and bad. If you don’t mind sharing, what’s like a bad habit you had that affected your professional life? – Well, goodness. We never like to admit our faults, do we? (laughing) How can I answer that? I don’t know. (laughs) – If you need to think about it (laughs) – Do you feel like you
over commit to things? – That’s very true.
(laughing) – Tony knows me. He knows me. He knows me, yeah. My three boards that I’m on. Yeah. It’s hard for me say no. It’s really hard. And I love being involved. And so then I justify that, well, I love to be involved and I have something to offer, so I’m gonna say yes. So yeah, that’s a bad habit
that I need to change. Thank you, Tony. – Well, thank you. Oh, got one more. – I just had a quick
question on your career. It sounds like you kind of took
on a position at St. Luke’s around the time when Centra was starting to get to Green Bay. So what sort of marketing
strategies did you use to get St. Luke’s kind of up to the level that Centra was at since Centra is so much bigger? – Are you Aria?
– Yeah. – Okay, hi, Aria.
– Hi. – (chuckles) I know her parents. When I moved to St. Luke’s, I was in a new position. The marketing was managed from
a vice presidential level. There wasn’t a director. So it was a real opportunity
for me to focus full-time on running the marketing department, marketing and business planning. And I really re-allocated a lot of our resources that we had. We were working the Twin Cities ad agency and really outsourcing a lot of our work, and not using those dollars efficiently. So with my agency background
I was able to really bring that knowledge of how and when you should work with an agency. You shouldn’t work with
agency on day-to-day newsletter communications. Internal newsletter communications should be done internally. Because we know the pulse
of the organization. We were working with them on every single flyer that we had. So one of the things I did
was hire a graphic designer to work in house so we could have a lot more economical flyers made, much faster turnaround. So our budget really hasn’t increased. Maybe a little bit, but it hasn’t increased
too much over the years. But I feel I’m very proud of how we’re using the dollars to make a bigger impact in the market. – Thank you.
(audience applauding)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *