Taking Medicine Personally: Addressing Emerging Patient Needs

Taking Medicine Personally: Addressing Emerging Patient Needs


– The title of Christi Shaw’s speech, which you’re about to hear,
is “Taking Medicine Personally “and Addressing Emerging Patient Needs.” Christi, in April, was appointed
US Country Head President of Novartis Corporation and President of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, and for her, healthcare progress
is the highest priority. On a side note, Novartis is the
number one company this year on the top 50 companies for diversity. (clapping) Christi, last night, accepted our award for the Top Company for Diversity Management Progress for Novartis, so they are doing a terrific job. As for Christi, she joined
Novartis in July, 2010, as Head of North America Novartis Oncology where she oversaw all
operations including medical, commercial and staff
functions for US and Canada. During her tenure there, the
North America Oncology business achieved unprecedented positive growth, despite key patent loses. She improved margins while
successfully launching two new chemical entities
and six new indications. This contributed to strong,
strategic brands growth. Her continued dedication
to ensuring patient access to innovative medicines,
along with her ability to mobilize organizations
to deliver results that exceed expectations, are
hallmarks of her leadership. I’m very proud to introduce Christi Shaw. (clapping) – Thank you, very much. A gracious introduction, thank you. Good afternoon, everyone. It’s a pleasure for me to be here. You know, as President
and US Country Head, I lead a company, working every day to recognize and support DNI. As a mother, it’s also a lesson
I continue to teach my son and many times learn from my
six-year old son, Christian. I know right now many families are getting ready for Halloween, and it’s a huge, big deal in our house. I always think, “Oh,
what’s my son gonna pick? “Is he gonna be a superhero, “or somebody out of a storybook?” And he surprises us every year. This year he’s going to be
“swimming with the sharks.” (laughing) I haven’t quite figured out exactly where he’s putting the
candy in the costume that we’ve gotten for him,
but we’re having a great time. He’s always truly original. It’s my goal to try to make
sure that individuality and creativity continues within him. It’s a season that reminds us to make sure that we allow for that individuality. It shouldn’t stop as we get older. In childhood, we have
it, so why should it stop when we become adults? It really should be the foundation of everything we do with DNI. It supports a richer,
more interesting and, I believe, an innovative world. This outlook, I know,
is championed by Luke, in the Diversity Inc. team. Amazing what can be accomplished when we embrace differences,
and this is one of the reasons that we’ve gained so much through working with Diversity Inc. I wanna thank Luke and his team for driving the DNI agenda
forward, and you do it with such authenticity and passion. He’s been, and the team has been, such a great partner for us. You challenge our organization
every step of the way and you also drive us to further embed DNI in everything that we do. For that, we are grateful. Thank you. (clapping) I’m incredibly proud to
lead this organization. I took this role just six months ago, being at Novartis for five years. It’s truly extraordinary
because, from the beginning and early on, the company
really has demonstrated a strong and consistent commitment to DNI. A strong leadership team that we have views and reinforces DNI as
foundational to our culture and to the components of
our business strategy. This mindset has helped
us improve our approach and also, although I’m
extremely proud of it, I know that it’s a journey as well and that we have much to do
to strengthen what we do, specifically as it comes to understanding all of the patients that we serve. I’m thrilled this afternoon
to be talking about taking medicine personally. I smile because I’m not
gonna be talking about personalized medicine
or mapping the genomes. Don’t get worried. But, we will be talking about
how Novartis is changing the way we operate from the
inside out, and really enhancing our internal business operations and working with customers and
to improve patient outcomes. Our goal is simple: to
get the right medicine to the right patient at the right time. To achieve this we have to ensure that DNI is not just a mantra, but
is a winning proposition. I didn’t realize it at the time, but when I was playing basketball
in high school, my coach was very specific on making
sure that, as individuals, we practiced by ourselves, that we honed our individual skills. He was insistent on that. Then we came together
and leveraged our skills and worked as a unit. We became a formidable
adversary in competition. If we actually practice
things like this all the time, and really incorporated it
into everything that we do, what would we become? I was very fortunate, two
weeks ago, with members of that basketball team, to be inducted into our high school hall of fame. It was very much a tribute
to go back and think about how were we so successful? And then see people in their lives today, about taking that individuality,
bring it together as a team and what great things could happen. This is much like we conduct our business and approach our customers. We have to have these
positive disruptors in order to drive innovation and
really help with solutions for our patients. It’s especially significant in light of the evolving healthcare landscape. There’s a number of factors that we have to consider in our business. Things like the US demographics,
the patient populations and diseases on incidents
that are occurring, the changing legislative
and regulatory landscape in healthcare policies and new provider and payer policies that are taking place. We have to be able to be
sure that we can respond to the changes and anticipate
and address patient’s needs. DNI is at the center of
that strategic focus. We must have a firm understanding
of many of the challenges that patients are facing. They’re facing challenges
like their health, their finances, their
quality of life, and even how to navigate the healthcare system. We must acknowledge that and be a solution to helping those patients
and addressing their needs. Let’s talk about some
of these key influencers and the implications of how
we approach the customer. It’s a significant shift
in the US demographics. Citizens are getting older,
like all of us unfortunately, and the baby boomers are aging. They’re living longer and
so by 2030 it’s estimated that one-third of the US
population will be on Medicare. They’ll be on Medicare for about 20 years. The population’s also
becoming much more diverse. By 2020, 35% of the American
population will consist of ethnic minorities. We predict that the traditional groups that were considered
minority populations today, that by 2043, which isn’t that far off, will actually be the majority. In fact, we’ll be a plurality nation. There won’t be one single
ethnicity majority. The landscape is really changing and how we approach our
patients is critical. In addition to the number of diseases that can be categorized
as chronic or ongoing and manageable, these are
increasing dramatically as well, as science gets better and
healthcare gets better. We’re seeing this,
obviously, in cardiovascular, hypertension and Diabetes,
but we’re also seeing it now in Multiple Sclerosis and cancer, being a longer-term condition. Access and the ability to receive care, we already know, really
varies by your ethnicity and by race and we need to solve for that. Digital and social media are also creating a new environment,
a new dynamic for all of us, how patients access their information on healthcare to make decisions. We know mobile health
tools are allowing patients to monitor their own health. You’ve got EKG’s, you’re
able to photograph infected ear drums. People are wearing the wrist bands that track your fitness and your sleep, and then they’re sharing the information. They’re taking control of their health, sharing it with everyone and sharing it with healthcare providers. Patients are actively engaged
in social media channels and they’re discussing their health issues as well as seeking answers online. We see the blogger
community really emerging as critical influencers, and they’re becoming trusted resources for patients. In fact, statistics at
the Pew Research Center, on social networking usage,
show us that if you cut the data by gender, 71% of women and 62% of men, access social networking sites. By ethnicity, 72% of Hispanics,
68% of African-Americans, and 65% of whites are accessing
social network platforms. So, the potential to reach
these patient populations is really becoming
almost limitless for us. Patients have these expectations now of real-time information. “I want it right now and I
don’t want the corporate speak.” We need to meet them where they are and we need to learn
to responsibly navigate these new influencers and
channels that are being created in order to create better outcomes. The face of the patients that we serve will continue to change. They’ll have new needs that’ll emerge as they manage complex medical conditions. There’ll be a greater emphasis
on improved quality of care and our being able to
demonstrate and measure that we’re improving
patient health, is critical. These factors all work together to create a unique opportunity, actually. It sounds like a lot of
challenges, but it really is a unique opportunity for
us, for Novartis specifically, as we try to lead and be
competitive, to understand and address some of those challenges and really help with the disparities that we see in the US healthcare system. There’s more. There’s also the changing and
increasing and important role that the government is
playing on both the Federal and the State level. It’s another key influencer affecting our business landscape. In federal law, the Affordable Care Act, it’s expected to provide
greater access to healthcare, which, for many diverse
patients, continues to be a significant issue. The research suggests that
of the newly insured patients in the ACA, one in four are
Black, Asian, Native American, or multiracial and more
than a quarter of them, about 30%, will speak a
language other than English. Today, the government is
actually paying for nearly half of all healthcare costs. Half. And what we’re seeing
is the continued growth has been declared unsustainable. Lastly, and perhaps
probably the most important, is that the US Food and
Drug Administration, with the support of the
Patient Advocacy community, has renewed its commitment
to increasing the enrollment of diverse patients in clinical trials. This is directly linked to emerging data that suggests biological
diversity may result in different disease risk
profiles and , in some cases, play a roll in how people
will actually process and respond to treatments. In August, the FDA
published its action plan to enhance the collection and availability of demographic subgroup data. It’s focused on improving
the completeness and quality of the subgroup data,
identification and barriers to clinical trial enrollment
and developing strategies to promote greater participation and then making subgroup
data more available and more transparent. As a result, Pharma, our
industry trade association, the National Minority Quality Forum, the National Clinical Trial
Network, and Microsoft have come together to
help rethink, reshape and increase diversity in clinical trials. In fact, they’re partnering is spearheading an national
campaign known as “I’m in,” which we’re, obviously,
extremely committed to. Taken one at at time, these
forces are significant, but in combination they
require us to reexamine almost every aspect of how
we conduct our business. They’re an integral part of our mission so that we can help increase
the diverse patient populations and help them lead
longer and better lives. We need to build a value
proposition that speaks to their beliefs and their
experiences and needs, as well as the needs of our
providers and our payers. We have to think differently,
work differently, empowered by this relentless
focus that we have on patients and the possibilities of
what we can do for them. This is even more critical as
our own portfolio at Novartis continues to evolve and spans diseases with significant prevalence
in diverse populations, for us, Multiple Sclerosis in women, cardiovascular disease, which
has a significant presence in the African-American
and Hispanic communities. Moving forward we’ll be required to take a fundamentally
different approach to outreach in order to strengthen our connections to the diverse patients
as well as the providers. The big question is what
are we gonna do differently to not only meet, but
exceed the emerging needs of these patients and
bring the right medicine to the right patients at the right time? We’ve made really important
shifts in three specific areas. One is how we structure our business and build new capabilities to
meet our new patient needs. Second, is ensuring that
DNI and our strategy aligns with our business
goals so that it’s integrated into our commercial
strategies, early and ongoing. Three, talent and culture. Our organization needs to
reflect our diverse customers that we serve and we do this, have to have culture sensitivity, understanding,
to be able to deliver on our commitments to patients. Let’s take a deeper dive into these. The first one, structure and capabilities; we wanna ensure that our
business structure supports our ability to focus
externally and address the important needs of patients. There’s a burning platform to do this. There’s a lot of capabilities that support the emerging needs of
the diverse customers. An example I’ll give you is
last year we launched a patient and specialty services model, specifically for the Multiple Sclerosis community. It was an entirely new,
in-house capability for us. We saw an opportunity to get
closer and to better serve our MS patients who are
taking our medicine. We knew that they needed
this support getting started with their medication, reimbursement, and unique services that were
required for each patient. Today, our in-house
patient services group, which includes nurses,
among other experts, provides real-time, direct assistance with logistics and other support. It’s tailored to the
individual patient need, helping to gain access
to our products and also taking the products the
right way for the long-term. They receive patient education. They also helped with adherence support and also follow-up care. The feedback’s been really positive. We know we’re enhancing
patient/physician experience and we’re excited to apply this model across all of our disease states. Another important capability
involves social media. Today there’s an avalanche
of communication channels that are accessed, as
I talked about earlier. We’re targeting specific
groups through these platforms. It can be very challenging
in a regulated industry. We’ve always said, “no,” before because of the environment that we’ve been in, but we can’t have that excuse anymore. We need to find ways to
meet our diverse patients where they are because they need us. But we need to do it
responsively and effectively. Building on our patient
services capabilities, let me tell you what
we’re doing for patients with MS in social media. Taking a page from consumer
brands like United Airlines and Starbucks, we recently
launched real-time conversation capabilities on Twitter and offer customer service,
delivered through social media. We engage with the patients and consumers and healthcare professionals on Twitter to provide real-time customer
service, product information and educational resources. We support the MS community with a complete social media ecosystem. We have presence on YouTube, Facebook, and our Twitter handle
is @GILENYAGoUSOnly. This Twitter handle is actually the first branded product
handle in the industry. We currently have thousands
and thousands of followers including MS influencers
and thought leaders. We’re really proud. We’ve received recognition from Google and the Digital Health Coalition. However, we also know that
our journey needs to continue to ensure that we have a
strong and relevant connection with patients that we serve
in the social media realm. One of the most effective ways to continue to meet the needs of the
patients through a DNI strategy, it really tracks along
with our business goals. It is reflected early in
our commercial strategy and we recently relaunched
our DNI strategy in support of that. This will integrate diverse perspectives of patients, providers and the entire arc of drug development, from
research, development through commercialization. In the past, we tended to think about it after we had a product that
we were commercializing and here, it’s more than
following the science. We need to start earlier. We cannot wait until we launch a compound to figure out what are
the needs of the patient. The process must take place as soon as our potential treatment, our molecule, becomes an idea and starts
to enter the pipeline. As we focus on new products,
we’ll identify unique and diverse patient populations. We’ll heighten our
focus on securing robust patient segmentation data
and cultural insights, and, importantly, overcoming obstacles in increasing patient diversity
in our clinical research by redefining how we recruit
patients for clinical trials. Based on these disease demographics and geographical sight
selection for trials, we expect that our clinical
trials will have more diversity that reflects the
incidence of the disease. In our ongoing clinical
trials on heart failure for patients with heart
failure, which is a disease that disproportionately
affects African-Americans, we’re partnering with a
non-profit organization, such as the National
Minority Quality Forum. We want to ensure that we
have a significant number of African-Americans that are
enrolled in those studies. We’re also sponsoring efforts of the non-profit organizations to develop national public awareness campaigns, to ensure more Americans
engage in the research and development process,
that brings hope to so many. In the United States of
America, our recruitment into clinical trials is
actually sub-par relative to other developed nations,
especially compared to Europe. It’s an area which we
simple cannot do enough. It’s critical that clinical
trials are reflective of the patients who they
are designed to help. In addition, we will continue to build our capability to
commercialize new treatments by creating strategies that
address the specific needs of diverse patients and integrate them into our cross-cultural marketing plans. It’s an area where we have
some experience already and from a business perspective,
the ROI’s are tremendous. It’s something that
makes good sense for DNI but even more sense for the business. An example of our multicultural
program for African-American and Hispanic patients, that we
learned from the MS program, African-Americans are
under-treated in Multiple Sclerosis and we also found that Hispanic
Multiple Sclerosis patients have an earlier onset of symptoms
than non-Hispanic Whites. Hispanics experience a
greater degree of symptoms. As we take these ethnicity-by-ethnicity, the biology really is impacting
how we treat these patients. Our “Speaking Up, Speaking
Out” program was designed to actively engage the African-American and Hispanic patients, to empower them to consider treatment options for MS. It yielded outstanding results and it supports the
realization that, rather than consider these opportunities
one brand at at time, that we should better
understand the disease state in its entirety, to ensure
that, from the start, we develop an approach that
is more fully integrated into an overall strategy. Externally, given the complexity of the healthcare delivery
system, partnerships with providers prove
increasingly important. We will build our capabilities
to develop programs and initiatives to provide services that address the needs
of patients holistically and we’re working
hand-and-hand with physicians, providing them with the
tools to treat larger and more diverse patient populations. An example is our recent
Women in Neurology program. Consistent with the
feedback that we received, there’s a need for education on issues affecting female Multiple
Sclerosis patients. Realizing that both providers
and patient-needed education, we actually brought together neurologists that did not always have
the time or expertise to do it themselves. And we brought in a group
of women neurologists speaking directly to female
Multiple Sclerosis patients on a peer-to-peer level. We called that “Women in
Neurology Speaker Program.” It was launched recently and the feedback has been tremendous. As we look at the diverse
populations that we serve, actually grouping them
for their needs as well, so that they can find a
safe environment to talk, is really critical. Last, but not least, is
really making sure at Novartis that we have the right people. This means reflecting back and
ensuring that our associates reflect the diverse
populations and the patients and communities that we serve. Leadership accountability,
not just hope and prayer, but accountability, will
continue to be a cornerstone of our efforts to support
the diverse candidates for key positions. We must continue to foster
a more inclusive culture to drive greater diversity
of thought and innovation, benefiting our patients and our customers. Let me ask every one of you a question. When you think about
going into your meetings and you usually have a
view before you go in of what you want the outcome
to be, how many of you go into that meeting and
then have the meeting and when you leave, have a different view? If that’s happening, and it should happen, I would suggest, at
least half of the time, I think you’re hitting a pretty good mark. Going into a meeting
and having the outcome already predetermined and
coming out with the same answer, you may wanna do some self-reflection to say are you really being inclusive and listening to what people
are saying in the meeting? The more value we bring
in the innovative ideas and different ways of
thinking about things, that’s what’s gonna make
us stronger and better. It’s something that we’re committed to, to be an integral part of
our fabric at Novartis. I’m also really proud of our
employee resource groups. We have 40% of our population at Novartis that’s enrolled in these resource groups. Through the ERG’s we’re
building a better understanding or the unmet patient needs
that we need to garner and we’re also getting greater insights and opportunities to effectively address the emerging needs of the
diverse patients that we serve. Our success to date includes,
we had a specific cultural and ethnic resource group. Previously they assisted
us with improving outreach to the Hispanic patients
in Alzheimer’s Disease, by providing us feedback and insights to the brand team on a marketing campaign, which really fostered us
to go bigger and broader. As we did that, and you
look at the ACA’s feedback on patient engagement, we started a voice of the patient project, to
help us better incorporate feedback and patient perspectives, utilizing the resource
groups along the way of our product life cycle. Because the ERG’s represent such a diverse and multifaceted community,
we solicit their input on an ongoing basis and
before this year’s end, our respiratory franchise,
we will have reviewed the culturally appropriate
content to reach out to Hispanic and Chinese patients. As we move forward with new
indications in heart failure, we anticipate relying
even more on our ERG’s to support the market
research we’ll be doing to understand the needs of this
diverse patient population. There’s still many areas of opportunity yet to be explored and leveraged, and we’ll really be
looking for out of the box, open-minded thinking while we remain extremely patient-focused. But none of us can afford
to rest on our laurels when it comes to DNI
because that’s the root of our success and business. As for Novartis being ranked
number one by Diversity Inc., as the number one company for diversity, it merely marks the
beginning of our journey. Our business is to help all patients live longer and better lives. When I say this, it always moves me, because even after all the years that I’ve been in the business,
our work is a sacred trust. It’s a responsibility that
I take very personally. Speaking personally, I had
the opportunity to hear an amazing young women who reminded me of the power of DNI at every age. I have the honor of serving on a board of the Young Women’s Leadership Network, which is an outstanding
organization dedicated to supporting young women
to pursue higher education and fulfill their learning
and leadership potential. At their Empower Breakfast last week, there was a 7th grader,
her name was Jabba, who told a wonderful story. She was thrilled to attend a summer camp. It’s a specific YWLN summer camp. She shared a truly inspirational
story about her experience. Unlike most kids who would have
talked about the activities and the programs, Jabba told
us that she loved the camp because she could simply be herself. She could feel, experience, and enjoy what made her different and
unique without being judged. Simple, yet so insightful. That’s why I’m passionate about DNI. It really promotes
inclusion that allows people to be their authentic
selves and that’s powerful. It’s liberating and it’s a
lesson we should all remember. With greater external
focus, we will continue to evolve the ways that
we approach every aspect of our business at Novartis. We must have an organization
that’s able to reflect, as well as serve, the needs
of the diverse patients of today and of tomorrow. It’s not about perfection. It’s about exploring the possibilities and realizing our full potential. Before I take questions I’d like to ask that each of you make
a personal commitment. Consider and follow
through on the following: what are the ways in
which your organization can become more innovative,
more customer-centric and more successful by
embracing the many aspects, advantages and possible outcomes through greater DNI focus? By taking it personally
we will make it matter. Thank you! (clapping) Any questions? That’s okay. I said it all. (laughing) Thank you for helping me out. – [voiceover] Absolutely. (Christi laughing) – [voiceover] So, Christi,
what do you attribute the high success rate for inclusion in DNI within Novartis at a very impressive 40%? What would you attribute that too? – You know, I have to
attribute it to all leadership at all levels in our organization. I had to say I felt a little… I don’t know if uncomfortable
is the right word, but last night, accepting the award, I’ve been in the job six months and I really had nothing to do with it. My team just made me look really good. Leadership at all levels. It starts at the top, ensuring
that our executive committee focuses on this, that DNI is
embedded in our strategies. As we look at year to year,
our 2015 objective’s coming up, it’s in everybody’s objective. It’s a 20% waiting. It’s embedded within
and so having it there and an expectation at the top level, but also making sure leaders at all levels continue to have that
embedded along the way. I think we’ve also found,
and what I’ve found, is that the ERG’s are so contagious. There’s quite a few of
them and I could see myself in many of them. It’s hard to pick and
choose, but the communication and the follow through
on what they’re doing means to what our business
is every day, is palpable. It’s something, as you
live and breathe everyday, that it’s right front and center. I have to give the credit
to most of the people that are in this room from Novartis. – [Linda] Hi, Christi. – Hi. – [Linda] I’m Linda
DaSilva, with EY and I’m also on the board of the HBA,
so I wanna thank Novartis ‘cuz they’re very supportive of the Healthcare Business
Women’s Association. My question for you is, as many companies have these ERBG’s and the
leaders are investing a lot of time doing this volunteer in addition to their workload, many
of them are finding it really challenged about
whether the organization looks at that as a leadership
development potential, versus something that people
are passionate about and doing. I was curious, when Novartis looks at those high-potential, high-performers as they’re coming up
through the organization, does that experience
kind of segregate them or give them higher visibility for future advancement
in the organization. What’s the culture around that? – I would have to say, absolutely, because the leaders of our ERG groups are also sponsored by
the Executive Committee and they also come to
the Executive Committee at certain times with
their plans or their asks, whether it’s resources
or our time or supportive of something that they’re gonna do. So, the leaders of the ERG
groups are pretty well known. I think it is definitely helpful to them, at least we know who they are,
where you may not otherwise. I also think when we’re talking
about career advancement, what you’ve done from a
DNI perspective is part of the discussion that we have from a career advancement standpoint. It’s not that you have to lead an ERG to be able to get ahead, but we wanna know that you care and that
you understand that DNI is critically to the
success of the company, before you become a leader
on the Executive Committee.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *