UniverSharing | Digital Marketing & Social Selling: éléments clés de votre stratégie commerciale

UniverSharing | Digital Marketing & Social Selling: éléments clés de votre stratégie commerciale


DIGITAL MARKETING
& SOCIAL SELLING KEY ELEMENTS OF YOUR
SALES STRATEGY Hello, Philippe. Thanks for joining us
to tell us about ‘Social Selling’, So could you explain it a little? Hi, Simon-Pierre. Thanks. Philippe Deliège, Estocada. I work
in a new field called ‘social selling’. It’s a new field.
Before explaining ‘social selling’, let’s explore why it’s suddenly appeared
on the market. In fact, ‘social selling’ is definitely not
a new sales technique invented by gurus
to try and bring salespeople together. No. It’s the result of changing
consumer behaviour. Consumers are becoming
more independent and we’re seeing now, that
via Google and social networks, they can access information. So they can ‘shop around’
before buying. They convince themselves to buy a
product, identify something they lack, find out more about products
that fill that gap, and then they pre-scan the market. We know that they love to do this. They love being independent
and to not be harassed by sellers. What’s quite astounding is that buyers do more than 67%
of the shopping process themselves, before they even need a seller. So that’s how
‘social selling’ came about: As a response
to these new consumer behaviours. Exactly, and that’s what
digital marketing’s about. Now, we’re able to intervene
as soon as a user identifies a need. When people have a need,
they use search engines. They use social networks and look
for information to solve their issue. And digital marketing
is about identifying the needs of these prospects,
these potential customers. It’s about providing them
with good content and showing that we,
as a business, can respond to the need
the consumer expresses and to push this content forward.
Pushing this marketing, no longer to just anybody,
but to the right people. With data and digital marketing
we can send messages much more efficiently and effectively. That’s where social selling comes in. Because marketing can now highlight and reflect this
content marketing strategy and, ultimately, the seller
is able to share this information, use it to stay ahead, and make themselves known
among ‘leads’ or prospects. Yes, they must be identified
within the buying process and marketing helps
by providing this content. A salesperson needs
to be there at the right time: Not too soon, nor too late. Beforehand, that was
the problem with sales. You didn’t know who to call. You’d call too early
and weren’t needed or someone had already beaten you
to it. It’s more efficient now. ‘Social selling’ has three foundations, three old sales techniques
that existed before social networks. The first technique
is ‘recommendation’. I call my regular customers,
who are very happy with my services, I ask: “Could you recommend me
to people in your network?” They can recommend me
to a number of people. That was the best technique
because someone had recommended my services. Now, we can imitate this process. Virtual word of mouth?
-Right. Before,
I was handling a dozen customers. So I could only apply this technique
a dozen times a day and I couldn’t keep asking them
to recommend me. Now, with the arrival of social networks, I can penetrate a customer’s network,
and even without asking them, I can appeal to people they know and identify people
who’ve used my services and get recommended
by more people. The second technique
pre-dates social networks, and is called ‘triggers’,
managing triggers. Imagine, for example, in a business, a Marketing Director changes company.
He’s your client. He changes company
and so leaves many opportunities, which he brings to his new employer along with his trusted suppliers. Before,
this technique was very popular because it’s the easiest to use, but don’t forget,
this person had changed jobs. You can’t ask all your clients
if they’ve changed jobs. But I’m on LinkedIn, and I’ve set up these triggers,
so I always see who’s changed jobs. And, depending on their move,
I decide whether to call them and see if it’s worth meeting them. The third technique
is more difficult to master. It’s called ‘Insight Selling’,
which means selling by insight. Let’s say I possess some insight
and I’m confident… I’m so certain
it will improve my client’s future, that when the time comes,
I pitch it and it makes perfect sense. But, for insight selling
you need opportunities. Even if I had four meetings a day, I could still only share my insight
four times a day. On occasions, I might be invited
to a networking space, and there I’d be able to speak
to twenty people and pitch to them. There, I’ll be noticeable
because of my insight. But that’s still very limited.
I can’t network every day. The third method is public speaking, but very few salespeople and directors
dare speak publicly and try to impact 400 people
because they have some insight. We’re seeing now, with social networks, every day,
I can choose to use insight selling and share what I truly believe in
via posts or tweets and such. So I’m constantly telling people
that I’m an insight seller. The advantage is that
this method costs nothing because I use sites
like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook and I’m never sent bills
by Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn for spreading my word.
-That’s right. Interestingly, the ‘sales’ side requires
this information and time spent sharing it. And you require marketing for
producing this strategy and content also at company level,
because obviously, to spread this content
to the right people at the right time and on the right device,
you need well-structured campaigns. That’s the power of using
your personal network, where all your contacts
see the information you share, but the company
should push it forward, too. There’s the ‘Customer Journey’
and the ‘See Think Do Care’ model. ‘See’ is really
all the potential clients. ‘Think’ is people
expressing a need. ‘Do’ is people wanting
to buy a service or product. ‘Care’ is clients, referrals,
upselling and cross-selling. Like when someone changes role
or company but doesn’t leave you. So ‘Care’ isn’t just with the same client,
it can also be with a person, a contact from another company. I think digital marketing
is about really… understanding the needs and
expectations of your prospective clients, and sharing
the right content and information using the different means
now available to companies. Whether it’s AdWords
or social networks, or about display
or programming. And then to carry and relay this message
through sales on social networks. And it’s the marketing department’s job to consider these salespeople
as real brands. So the Marketing Director
should see their team as a strong personal brand,
and showcase them and make sure salespeople are identified
early in the buying process. And this doesn’t all come for free so
marketing budgets should be set aside for increasing the virtual presence of
salespeople within the buying process. So the important thing with marketing is to showcase these in-house
salespeople and experts and say: “Work with us and you won’t just have
visual marketing or company ‘branding’, you’ll have a salesperson and expert who will carry your message
and amplify it.” Normally, if an article’s written,
not just by marketing, but by an expert or salesperson, it can
be promoted among the right people. The salesperson actually has
a trump card: their authenticity. If you prepare me
content that’s ready to use, I’ll share it straight away, but when I release it,
I’ll add my own personal touch, so people will see that I’m involved
in creating products, which strengthens my expert status. Another advantage of digital
marketing and social selling is: Analysing digital
we can quantify these actions. And we can try to analyse behaviours,
upstream and downstream, and analyse the whole sales cycle,
from marketing to closing. And the huge advantage is that we can better quantify
these interactions and their importance so that management understands and has the data required
to quantify this work. Quantifying it is very important. It’s a little easier for you
because when you have the data it’s possible to measure
marketing plans. Sales are a bit more complicated
due to the human aspect. Ultimately, you don’t know
why the person signed. Was it great sales techniques?
Was the product good? There are lots of elements
that make it difficult to quantify. However, we can measure things. But, speaking
from personal experience, my sales cycle has shortened. Before, new prospects
would visit several times before signing a purchase order. But now, most people
sign one on their first visit. I now average 1.2,
so sometimes I fail, but very often, people will sign
at our very first meeting. Why? Because they know me, and they already recognise me
as an expert in my field. Also, I’ve increased the average size
of my initial purchase orders. Before, my entry point was 3,000 euros
for a few days of consultancy, a few half-days of consultancy, whereas now, during initial meetings,
I’ll suggest comprehensive plans, costing over 30,000 euros and it’s they’ll likely sign
a purchase order at the first meeting. So ‘social selling’ improves
the efficiency of the sales process. It is like you see
in the automotive sector. Previously, customers would take
an average of 5… 3 to 5, showroom visits
before buying a car. Now it’s down to 1 or 2 visits because customers research online
and pinpoint the car they want. They really just come
to check out the seller. To see if they answer questions right and whether they meet
their expectations. They’re there to ‘close’ the customer.
-Exactly. Sellers are becoming ‘closers’ again. Thank you, Philippe,
for talking to us. See you soon.
-Thank you, Simon-Pierre. WANT TO KNOW MORE?

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