Using GRS 20 to Schedule Electronic Systems

Using GRS 20 to Schedule Electronic Systems


Thank you for joining us for this recorded web seminar from the US National Archives and Records Administration’s National Records Management Training Program. In this briefing, first presented in September 2012, Susan Means of NARA’s General Records Schedules Team covers a number of ways federal agencies can use GRS chapter 20 to schedule electronic records and systems. Let’s join the seminar. Kitty Carter: Good afternoon, my name is Kitty Carter and I’m part of the National Training Team at the National Archives and Records Administration. I will be hosting today’s online briefing. These online briefings were created by NARA to present current records management subjects to a widely geographically-dispersed audience. This series of online briefings will allow us to maximize our limited government resources. This briefing will last approximately one hour. This hour includes a presentation on a topic for approximately 30 minutes, and then we will open up for questions and answers. As your phones are on mute, please feel free to use the chat box to ask questions during the presentation and the question and answer session. Today’s presentation is Using GRS 20 to Schedule Electronic Systems. We have Susan Means, Senior Records Analyst from NARA’s Pacific-Alaska region. Susan is a charter member of the General Records Schedule Team. She has been with NARA for 8 years. This session will answer questions on how to apply the GRS disposition authority for certain electronic records, electronic systems, and related hard copy records. With that said, I would like to turn it over to Susan Means. Susan Means: Good morning everyone, can you hear me? As Kitty said, my name is Susan Means. I’ve been with NARA for about 8 years. All of that time in Anchorage, Alaska. So I’m probably the person furthest west on the line today. Although we certainly may have some folks from Hawaii. That does happen. At any rate, I’m happy to get started with this briefing on using GRS 20 to schedule electronic systems. And of course entertaining some of your comments and questions from the chat box towards the end of our hour together. With that, I wanted to begin with just a little bit of background information. If you guys are on this webinar, you already at least have some passing familiarity with GRS 20. And that passing familiarity has probably resulted in as much confusion as clarity. We know that. Feedback, both anecdotal over the years and from a series of information-gathering sessions that the GRS team did earlier this year tells us that the GRS 20 is both confusing and out of date, with many of the items in GRS 20 dating from 1995 and earlier. In the world of electronic records and systems, that’s several lifetimes. So clearly we know that something needs to be done to address improving GRS 20 and bringing it into conformance with the way people manage systems and records today. As you know, revising record schedules can be a little bit of a drawn out process. So we wanted to create some quicker strategy that we hoped would provide some clarity and make the existing GRS 20 a little bit more usable for folks. The interim strategy was to create a series of frequently asked questions to provide that clarity. That’s the short term strategy. The near term strategy, not even a long term strategy, is that the GRS 20 is part of a 5 year effort to restructure the entire GRS. One of the GRS in the first years will focus on information and technology management. Which obviously GRS 20 is part of. That will take care of short term and near term updates. A little bit more background. There are several authorities in the mix. That’s what maybe complicates GRS 20 and understanding how to use it. GRS 20 deals with electronic records. I’ll talk more about specifics in a few slides. GRS 24 actually talks about information technology operations and management records. Related, but a little bit different. And then there are a couple of 36 CFRs (Codes of Federal Regulations) that are applicable here. 36-CFR-1225.22H talks about when records must be rescheduled. And that applies to records that are being converted to or used in another format, in some cases. And 36-CFR-1225.24 addresses when previously approved schedules can be applied to electronic records. So just keep those in mind. You’ll see those citations again as we move into the FAQs. The purpose of the FAQs was to provide additional guidance on using GRS 20 to schedule electronic systems. Specifically to input records, which GRS 20 item 2 deals with. Electronic records that replace hard copy records, which GRS 20 items 3 and 3.1 deal with. And output records, which GRS 20 items 4.5, 6.12, and 16 deal with. You might ask yourself what can you really do with GRS 20? Well you can do a lot, once it’s possible to make your way through the bog of some of the more obscure language. What GRS 20 allows you to do is to schedule, manage, and appropriately dispose of those input or source records, both hard copy and electronic, to schedule, manage, and appropriately dispose of electronic records, system master files (electronic records that replace hard copy or analog records where the original hard copy records are scheduled as media-neutral). As well as hard copy analog records where the original hard copy records are scheduled, but not as media-neutral. It also allows you to schedule, manage, and dispose of output records, system documentation records, and system maintenance records. That’s a lot of volume. And a pretty wide scope as well. THe first thing I want to talk about is applying GRS 20 to those input or source records. What you’ll see in a couple slides are some pretty detailed tables. But before we get there I want to define, from the perspective of GRS 20, what those input or source records are. These are sources of information in an electronic system. Records used to create, update, or modify a master file. And the master file is maintained to meet record keeping requirements and is covered by an already-exisiting NARA-approved schedule. These may be electronic files or hard copy documents. Keep that in mind. Because I think sometimes when we think about GRS 20, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that a large part of what GRS 20 addresses really is hard copy analog records. So as I said, this is where we really get into what the FAQ itself looks like. You’re looking at tables. And the goal when we started out was to try and create almost an “if-then” table. Something that would be easy to follow, where you would have a situation, so you would look at it and say, “If the situation is this, then I do that.” And I think we come close to that. But the GRS 20 is pretty complicated, so in some cases these tables have a series of columns and you have to step through them. And that’s what I’ll do fairly quickly in the time we have here. We’re talking first about input records that are in hard copy format. And you’ll see the first column is a description of the input record itself. In this particular case for these types of records, we try to provide some examples. That’s what those are. They’re examples, they’re not finite definitions. They’re simply examples of what these types of records might be. And then the questions asked. “Is the source record already scheduled?” “Are there any limitations imposed by the GRS?” And then we give you instructions on what to do. And the actual GRS citation that authorizes you to do whatever that instruction is. On this first page of the table we’re talking about hard copy records entered or scanned into the system where the electronic version captures all of the information on the hard copy. So hard copy records scanned into a system where the electronic version captures all of the information from the hard copy. Examples might be data entered into a system from a paper form or actual scanned images or PDF versions of hard copy records. Then the question becomes, is the input record already scheduled? If the answer is yes, and it’s scheduled as permanent, then we look at some limitations that might be imposed by the GRS. If the already-approved schedule says that the records must be transferred in hard copy, then the records must be transferred in hard copy. The instruction there is to apply the existing disposition authority for the source record, transfer the hard copy record. GRS 20 item 2A1 is the authority for that. Another limitation to ask yourself is whether the electronic version fails to meet NARA’s transfer standards for electronic permanent records. If that’s the case, you must again apply the existing disposition authority for the source record. GRS 20 item 2A2 is the disposition authority there. Then another limitation would be whether the schedule simply does not require hard copy transfer or is silent on the format of the records to be transferred to NARA. If the electronic format meets NARA’s transfer standards for electronic records, then you have the option to destroy the input source record 60 days after you’ve notified NARA that the e-system is replacing the hard copy records that have already been scheduled as permanent. And after you have verified that the electronic version is an accurate representation. So after the information has been converted and verified, and after it’s no longer needed for any legal or audit purposes on the part of your agency, or to support the reconstruction or serve as a backup for the electronic records. So that remains a fairly complicated mix to sort through, but the real crux of that is that if the schedule does not require that the hard copy records themselves be transferred, or doesn’t speak to the format at all, and if your electronic version of these previously hard copy input records meet NARA’s transfer standards, then you’ve got a notification requirement. But you can destroy the original hard copy records once you verify that the electronic version is an accurate representation. GRS 20 item 2A4 is the disposition authority there. Other types of input records and hard copy format. If you’ve got hard copy records scanned into the system where the electronic version captures all of the information on the hard copy, but they’re scheduled as temporary, then we’re not looking at any limitations that are imposed by the GRS. So these are hard copy records that capture all of the information. Once they’re converted to electronic form (and are scheduled as temporary), then the instruction per GRS 20 item 2A4 is to destroy the hard copy input records after the information has been converted to electronic form and verified. And again were no longer needed for legal or audit purposes or to support reconstruction of or serve as a backup to the electronic records. So that’s temporary records already scheduled. Another situation that you may encounter, and often do, is that the source records themselves may never have been scheduled. If that’s the case, it’s simply a matter of fact that those input records themselves must be scheduled. So conversion to electronic is not really a factor there. The input records themselves need to be scheduled. More situations of input records and hard copy formats. We’re still talking about input records. In this case, hard copy records converted to electronic format. But in this case, all of the information is not captured in the electronic version. Some examples of that may be records with hand-written annotations, that through the conversion process (scanning, data entry, etc.) are not captured. They either do not appear or are illegible. Whatever the case may be. That’s one example. Another example might be records with layered attached notes. And not all those are captured. Or color-dependent documents that are captured electronically, but only in black and white or in such a way that the color-coded information fails to come through. Those are some examples of that type of input record, where the electronic version fails to capture all of the information on the hard copy version. Again you’re going to ask yourself whether the source record is already scheduled. If the answer is yes, then you apply the existing disposition authority to the source record and dispose of it per the existing disposition instructions. If the answer is no, and the input record is not already scheduled, then again the input record itself must be scheduled. Another type of input record would be hard copy records where the electronic version does not replace the source record. This might be a case where you have a case tracking system in which users input information from the source documents. But the documents themselves remain a distinct entity outside the system. Again you’re asking yourself, firstly, are the source records themselves already scheduled? If the answer is yes, then apply the existing disposition authority for the source records. If the answer is no, then you have to undertake the SF-115 process to get the input or source record itself scheduled. Kitty Carter: Susan, I wanted to pause you very quickly. It looks like we have a question from Victor in the chat. Would GRS 20 item 2A4 apply to civilian personnel records that have been scanned into OPS? Susan Means: That’s something we’re taking under consideration. My preference would be, if Victor could pose that question in an e-mail to our GRS team e-mail address then we can take that under consideration as a team and get back to him directly. Those kinds of questions may also become the source of further revisions to the FAQs or the general guidance we put out related to, in this case, GRS 1 types of records. That work? Thanks. Now we’re talking about input records in electronic format. And the first type of electronic format input record that we look at are those electronic records used to create or update a master file. Examples of those would be work files, valid transaction files, intermediate input or output records. There really are no limitations imposed by GRS 20 relating to these types of electronic input records. So the instructions are to delete after information has been transferred to the master file and verified. The GRS authority for that is GRS 20 item 1B. The next type of input record are electronic records entered into a system during an update process. Examples of this would be copies of data files, or records from another system maintained by the agency itself. Limitations here might be that the electronic source records from, say, another system are in and of themselves required to be retained for legal or audit purposes. If that’s the case, then those input records have to be scheduled. If they’re not required for legal or audit purposes, they can be deleted after the electronic version is verified or when no longer need it as a backup. And GRS 20 item 2B is the disposition authority there. Yet another kind of electronic input record are electronic records received from another agency, used as input or source records. And we see this increasingly as agencies share information and have electronic systems created for internal agency purposes. Mission-related purposes. At some point in their lifecycle, these records feed into the system of another agency. A completely different agency. Without coming up with some really specific agency examples, but you can imagine that FAA might maintain information on bird strike hazards around airports. And they might share that information with the military, who maybe has air wings or squadrons located at some joint-use facilities. That kind of thing. There are probably many examples. Certainly in the natural resource management arena. A generic example would be copies of data files from a system in another agency. Some of the limitations that are imposed within the GRS are that if the data files from the creating agency are produced under an inter-agency agreement, or created for specific information needs of the receiving agency, then those records need to be scheduled. Those input records need to be scheduled. If they’re neither produced under an inter-agency agreement nor created for specific information agency needs of the receiving agency, then they can be destroyed after the electronic version is verified or when no longer needed for legal or audit purposes. Those are some examples there. Finally just a couple more input records in electronic format. Another type are uncalibrated or unvalidated data collected in observation or measurement activities, or research and development programs. Examples would be scientific observational data, say from satellites. Or research experimental test data. The instruction from GRS 20 is to delete after the necessary data has been incorporated into the master file. The thing to remember here is that on all three of these slides we’ve been talking about electronic records that are the input or source files seeding into an electronic system. So the vocabulary and nomenclature can get kind of confusing. But at any rate, these would be appropriate. And your instruction is to delete after the necessary data has been incorporated into the master file. And the GRS authority is GRS 20 item 2D. Finally electronic records that are scheduled elsewhere in the system that the input records are feeding into, and does not replace the source record. An example here would be a case tracking system in which users input information from the source records into an electronic system. But the records themselves remain a distinct entity outside the system. In that case you simply apply the source system’s existing disposition authority, if there is one, or schedule the source system, if it’s unscheduled. Those are input records in both hard copy format and input records in electronic format. There’s quite a long list of the different types of input or source records that it’s possible to encounter as you go about using the GRS to manage and ultimately dispose of these records. I did want to add one note, and that is that electronic files created specifically from one system as input to another system must either be covered by the GRS or separately scheduled. Even if the originating system is already scheduled. So keep that in mind. Let’s switch gears a little bit and talk about the system master files themselves. In most cases we are looking at electronic systems when we’re talking about using the GRS 20. Again some definitions. What are electronic records or system master files? In this case we’re talking about the actual content of the system or electronic record series. That may consist of data, scanned text, PDF files or digital images, or some other form of electronic information. Possibly other forms of electronic information that we haven’t even identified yet. It may include information content of the entire system, or content of a group of related files. The related records in a single master file are not always in the same format. And that’s something that you’ll see, for instance, in geographic information systems. Which may have geographic (GIS) layers themselves. But the system may include other kinds of electronic records as well. Scanned documents, images, those kinds of things. So keep that in mind. And then we have the table. This one looks a little bit different. We’re going to talk about whether the records are temporary or permanent first, and then give a description of the record, some conditions that might apply, and then answer the question of whether a new schedule is required. And then the GRS or CSR citation. This is the case where those CSRs that I mentioned at the very beginning of the presentation really do come into play. So we’re talking about master files that replace hard copy or analog records, where the original analog records are scheduled as media-neutral. So if the originals are scheduled as media-neutral, either directly or because of the date of the schedule. That’s what we’re talking about here. If we’re talking about master files that replace hard copy analog records, if we’re talking about original analog records that are temporary. These might be program records approved for destruction in a previously-approved schedule. And the schedule is media-neutral and does not explicitly exclude electronic records, then no new schedule is required. You simply apply the existing schedule. So for temporary records where there is an approved schedule in place, or the original, and the schedule is media-neutral, then no new schedule is required. If the disposition of the original hard-copy records is permanent – these are electronic records that replace permanent hard copy records. And the electronic records meet NARA standards for permanent records, then no new schedule is required. But there is a notification requirement. In this case agencies must notify NARA within 90 days of when the electronic record-keeping system becomes operational. And there is an exception. Notification is not required if the records are already being transferred to the National Archives as electronic records or maintained electronically when the media-neutral schedule items that cover them was approved by NARA. So in general if you’ve got permanent electronic records that replace permanent hard-copy records, and the electronic records meet NARA standards for permanent records, no new schedule is required, but there is a notification requirement. If the records do not meet NARA standards for transferring permanent records, then a new schedule is required. And GRS 20 item 3.1 is the disposition authority there. So then we have master files that replace hard copy or analog records where the original hard copy or analog records are already scheduled, but were not scheduled as media-neutral. For whatever reason. Either because of the date of the schedule (it may be an older schedule) or otherwise. Just a little caveat here: a schedule is only media-neutral if it 1) specifically states that it is media-neutral or that it applies to records in all formats, or 2) if it was submitted to NARA after December 17, 2007 and approved, and is not explicitly limited to a single medium. So there’s your definition of what constitutes a media-neutral schedule and what does not. So in this case if we’re talking about permanent original hard copy or analog records, any digital record previously scheduled in hard copy or analog format is permanent. If the electronic records that you’re converting to meet NARA standards for transfer of permanent records, then a new schedule is not required. But again that notification requirement exists. So agencies must notify NARA within 90 days of when the replacement electronic record-keeping system becomes operational. If the electronic system or records don’t meet NARA’s transfer requirements for permanent records, then a new schedule is required. And again the disposition authority is GRS 20 item 3.1. And then another addition to be aware of. If an electronic system replaces hard copy records that were never scheduled, then both versions (original hard copy and electronic system replacing them) must be retained until the electronic records are scheduled. New electronic systems that do not replace already-scheduled hard copy records must also be scheduled, of course. Switching gears yet again. Master files that replace hard copy or analog records where the original hard copy or analog records are scheduled, but not as media-neutral. In this case the disposition of the original is temporary. You might have several different examples here. They might be scanned images, audio-visual records, data relating to administrative or housekeeping records covered by the GRS or an agency schedule, program records, records containing information from both administrative or housekeeping functions, and program records in a single data record. Let’s look at scanned images first. These are temporary scanned images. The original hard copy. We’re talking about temporary scanned images. There are no conditions in the GRS and no new schedule is required. So you’ve got audiovisual records. No conditions apply and no new schedule is required. If you are talking about master files replacing hard copy analog records where the original hard copy records are scheduled but not as media-neutral, and the original was temporary, and the records consist of data relating to administrative or housekeeping types of records covered by the GRS or an existing agency schedule, then the records are not subject to the GRS with some exceptions. And those accepted records would be GRS 1 item 21, GRS 1 item 22, GRS 1 item 25-S, GRS 12 item 3, and GRS 18 item 5. If the records are not subject to these very specific exceptions, then no new schedule is required. However if they do fall within one of these excepted categories, then a new schedule is required to be submitted. Then the category of program records is pretty straightforward. A new schedule is going to be required. And for records that contain a hybrid mix of administrative and program records, then a new schedule is also going to be required. So one of the ways that I approach looking at these tables, that get pretty complex, not as complex as the narrative form of GRS 20 itself, we hope, but nonetheless you have to work through these tables. And part of the way we do that is always keeping in mind what that overarching title is. If we’re talking about master files that replace hard copy records where the original hard copy records are scheduled but were not scheduled as media-neutral. And we’re talking about originals that were temporary, and the records are scanned images. The records are audiovisual records. You have to just step through it and find the correct category for the type of record you’re dealing with, and then step through the individual columns to see if it’s something that’s going to require a new schedule or not. The third category that the GRS 20 applies to are output records. What are output records? Well we all have a pretty good idea of what output records are, but just for definition’s sake, we’re talking about records derived from the system master file. So for example a report that agency staff print out from the system itself. It may be electronic or hard copy. And reports produced using system information, but not created directly from within the system itself, are not system output records. For example, annual reports that are prepared by looking at information contained within the system, by analyzing information, even by extracting little snippets of information. These are not necessarily output reports. It’s really reports that are derived from the system master file. So it’s a function that the system itself provides. And here is the table. We have the description of records, in some cases some examples, disposition instructions, records excluded from coverage, and then the GRS citation. So in the first category here, electronic system output records. That would be data files created by summarizing or aggregating information from a single master file or database scheduled as temporary on a NARA-approved schedule or disposable under an existing GRS item. An example would be data pulled from queries to produce a report out of a system. The disposition instructions here are that these are temporary and can be deleted when the agency determines the data files are no longer needed for administrative, legal, audit, or other operational purposes. Keep in mind we’re talking about the output record here. Temporary, delete when the agency determines it’s essentially no longer needed. There are some records that would be excluded from coverage here. And the categories of exclusion are: if the originating master file was scheduled prior to January 1, 1988, if the outputs were created as disclosure free files to allow public access to the information, or if the originating master file was scheduled as permanent but the originating master file itself is no longer accessible or no longer exists. In that case the temporary and delete instructions would not apply. Another category of records, electronic system output records, are data files created by extracting records from a single master file or database scheduled as temporary on a NARA-approved schedule, or disposable under a GRS item. And again, the disposition instructions are to delete when the agency determines the data files are no longer needed for administrative, legal, audit, or other operational purposes. Many of the same exclusions apply. If the objects were created as disclosure free files to allow public access, or if the extraction process actually changes the informational content of the originating master file, or if the originating master file was scheduled as permanent but is no longer accessible. And then several other types of electronic system output records: data files extracted from a data file or database without changing it and used solely to produce hard copy publications or printouts of tabulations, ledgers, registers, and statistical reports, electronic queries or ad hoc reports, electronic queries or reports published on the web from an administrative housekeeping system. And I’m going to just quickly run through these. We’ve provided some examples. The one thing I would point out for the data files extracted from the master file or database without changing it. These are primarily print files. Specifically they were created in a mainframe environment. Not so much anymore, but there may still be some instances where you’ll see them. And because it’s represented in the GRS 20, we’ve included it in the FAQ. Electronic queries or ad hoc reports. These would be routine system queries, not necessarily printed out. Routine reports that are generated and viewed in electronic format within the system itself. Those kinds of things. And all of these are handled as temporary and can be deleted when the agency determines they’re no longer needed for whatever administrative, legal, audit, or other purpose they were generated for in the first place. And then finally, queries or reports that are printed out to meet ad hoc business needs. Again these are temporary and can be destroyed when the agency determines that the printouts are no longer needed. Or these are printouts, in this case, that you may opt to file with the appropriate related series. So if you’re printing out reports to meet ad hoc business needs, it may very well be that the reports themselves can become part of a larger case file, for example. Filing them with that other record series is perfectly suitable. In that case they would be disposed of in accordance with the approved schedule for the series that they’re filed with. Finally, applying GRS 20 to system documentation records. The definition. System documentation records consist of data system specifications, file specifications, code books, record layouts, user guides, output specifications. The kind of documentation about the system itself and how to use the system. Those kinds of things. But these are not records relating to the actual development of the system. Records relating to the development of the system are not system documentation records, and are more likely to be covered under GRS 24. Really we’re just talking about two types: system documentation for temporary systems and permanent systems. System documentation for a temporary system, the GRS citation and disposition instruction is GRS 20 item 11A1. The documentation records themselves are temporary and can be destroyed or deleted upon authorized deletion of the related electronic records or systems. Or upon destruction of the output of the system, if the output is needed to protect legal rights. Whichever is later. And if the system documentation relates to permanent systems, then the disposition authority is GRS 20 item 11A2. And the system documentation records themselves are also permanent. They are to be transferred to the National Archives with the permanent electronic records or system to which the documentation relates. One thing to be aware of as we are rapidly engaging with and moving into the Electronic Records Archive world: if the records are being transferred via the Electronic Records Archive, then the instruction is not to use this GRS item to transfer the documentation, but to use the disposition authority for the master files themselves. Because we want them to come in as a package, we don’t want them being transferred under two separate disposition authorities. So if you’re transferring a permanent electronic system to the National Archives via ERA, transfer the documentation under the disposition authority that applies to the electronic system itself that you’re transferring. And then there are system maintenance records. These are pretty straightforward, so I’m not going to spend a lot of time on them. We’re talking about several types of system maintenance records. There are records related to system performance testing. These are electronic files that are created solely to test system performance, as well as hard copy printout and related documentation for the electronic files or records. But all of it related to system performance testing. These are temporary records that can be deleted or destroyed when your agency determines they’re no longer needed for administrative, legal, audit, or other operational purposes. Then you might have records related to system usage. These would be electronic files and hard copy printouts created to monitor system usage, including but not limited to things like login files, password files, audit trail files, actual system usage files, files used to assess charges back to individual users or departments for their actual system use. Those kinds of things. These too are temporary and may be deleted or destroyed once the agencies determine they are no longer needed. Backup files of permanent electronic records. These are temporary and can be deleted when the identical records have been captured in the subsequent backup file or when the identical records have been transferred to the National Archives and successfully copied. Backup files of temporary electronic records can be deleted when the identical records have been deleted themselves, or replaced by a subsequent backup file. Additional system maintenance records include special purpose programs, application software necessary solely to use or maintain a master file or database, and is authorized for disposal in a GRS item or a NARA approved records schedule. Excluding special purpose software necessary to use or maintain any unscheduled master file or database, or any master file or database scheduled for transfer to the National Archives. These are temporary and can be deleted when the related master file or database has been deleted. These are special purpose programs. And then finally user identification profiles, authorization and password files, full routine systems. These would be those that are not covered under GRS 24 item 8A. And it specifically excludes records relating to electronic signatures. These are temporary as well, and can be deleted or destroyed when your agency determines they are no longer needed. So that’s the FAQs really quickly. If you’ve had a chance at this point to take a look at the FAQs themselves, they’ve been out for about a month. There was a memo to agency records officers that came out about a month ago announcing that the FAQs had been issued. You can find these FAQs. And as I said the FAQs really are these tables. They’ll look a little bit different. Not nearly as colorful, and no graphics, but essentially the FAQs are these tables. You’ll find them online in two different places. The URLs are up here, for your information, and in the handouts that came along with this presentation. And GRS 20 Electronic Records is itself, of course, available on the NARA website at the URL here at the bottom. http://www.archives.gov/records-mgmt/grs/grs20.html So you’ve got that information. And then I wanted to provide you with some contact information. As I mentioned, we’re attempting to capture all of the questions, comments and suggestions relating to any GRS item. But in this case we’ll focus specifically on GRS 20. By asking folks to e-mail us at the GRS[email protected] e-mail address.And that way we’ve got a written record of the question and our response, or the comment or suggestion. And that will feed into a number of things. Possibly the revision of these GRS 20 FAQs. Issuance of further guidance related to other GRS. And it will certainly help as one avenue to inform and improve our efforts at restructuring the GRS which will begin here October 1st. It’s begun already, but it really begins full tilt with fiscal year 2013. So that’s one interactive way of getting information, getting questions answered, or making suggestions. Another source of information is the Records Express blog, which is at http://www.blogs.archives.gov/records-express So those are two online based sources for you. And I just wanted to mention who actually is on the GRS team. It’s not the same as attaching faces to names, but at least you can attach names and e-mail addresses to the GRS team. Andrea Riley is our team lead. She is located in Nebraska. One of the things that will become clear as I run through this list is that we are very much a virtual team. We’re located all across the country. Andrea’s in Nebraska. Jennie Guibaud is in College Park. Laura McHale is in New York. I am in Anchorage, Alaska. Leslie is back in College Park, and Galen Wilson is in Ohio. Some of you may know one or more of the team members already. Feel free to reach out to any of us individually, but we really do want to encourage the use of the GRS[email protected] e-mail addressfor most formal communications. Formal meaning that it’s something the entire GRS team should be aware of. That’s contacts and information. With that we’ll stop and take questions. And thank you very much. Kitty Carter: Thank you so much, Susan, for that great presentation. We learned a lot. It looks like we do have one question down here. This is from Lynnie. It says, “Will the restructured GRS address specific systems based on functional areas, or will the GRS 20 approach be available as a way of scheduling electronic records?” Susan Means: I think the latter. The way we’re approaching the restructuring effort is to attempt to restructure the entire GRS. We’re not talking about GRS 20 here, but the entire GRS, along functional business lines. Those kinds of concepts. What’s happened over the years with the GRS is that – you could argue that a lot of it is functionally based now. Some things have crept in that are really format based. And in a way that’s what GRS 20 is. There are a couple other GRSs that are really very format based. And to the extent that we can, that’s not the approach that we want to take. So I think the latter. The GRS itself will be restructured along functional areas and lines of business. And then in general, if you’re talking about systems – GRS 20 or something like it will still be out there as a tool. I don’t envision undertaking to schedule specific types of electronic systems in different GRSs. I don’t think we’re talking about necessarily scheduling electronic travel systems in and of themselves because we really want to schedule the function. We hope you found this seminar useful. For more information about the US National Archives and Records Administration and its National Records Management Training Program, please visit us online at www.archives.gov or view our current schedule of face-to-face and online workshops at www.nara.learn.com

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