Using Social Media to Develop a Personal Brand

Using Social Media to Develop a Personal Brand


So hello everybody, and definitely excited to be here again. I think the last time I was here outside of Jennifer’s class was the Entrepreneur Week and VAS. I came in to do something with VAS. But anyway, it was very exciting, a lot of exchanges. And I am focused today on personal branding and of course utilizing social media. One thing I just did was I twitted out this as Stanford base. So for everybody who is on Twitter, right click, just kind of check on my Twitter if you right click, and the notes are there, the random notes, just random. It says Stanford base. And if you click on it, it has like four or five or six or seven or eight or nine or 10 or 12 little thoughts, and I will be working kind of from those thoughts. [Informal Talk] Because there is a real correlation between personal branding and corporate branding, and I have been watching all things that are happening right now with some of my favorite companies out there. Obviously, I am a big fan of all the social media companies. Tristan, I met right here. Tristan came out of – I actually met him first at an event. He is over at Foursquare now but I think we can talk to Tristan all the time. So Foursquare is one of the companies I really think that has got it right along with, obviously, traditional companies and ecosystem around Twitter and some others. [Informal Talk] So [inaudible] I will jump right into it. I just came in from Atlanta. I was at the Black Enterprise Entrepreneurs Conference 2011. I had a good time with that and got back in probably around midnight or 1 o’clock. I am doing like you guys are doing final week, running both hands. I [inaudible] some random questions about some current events, nobody knew anything. It’s like everybody is unplugged from everything. So how many friends of Lady Gaga? See, now we go. Yes, a bunch of Lady Gaga fans. So one thing I wanted to emphasize was personal branding. I want to define it, and defining a personal brand, Lady Gaga is a very good example. I would argue with anyone that the culture of her brand, and by the way personal brand equates to the culture of view so the culture of you. So the culture of view utilizing Lady Gaga, her culture is now bigger than the music and the music is good and it’s very big. And what do I mean by that and how did she end up defining that culture? Well, from one aspect, early on, the community tried to define what a brand was. And the thing about that is that the community may not even be fans of your product. So we have the behaviors at iTunes, there is a group of individuals at iTunes. No matter whose album comes out, it doesn’t matter. They go to that artist site and they attack, one star, one star, half a star, I hate it, I hate it, I hate it. But they don’t even like the band. They are not even a fan of the band. So it sends out the wrong message to non-fans because they really think that someone is reviewing the product, the album and giving it negative reviews. So one of the great things about social media is what, we get to control the messaging to a certain extent. So one of things you want to always do is have your fans go in your night when your product is being released and give it the five stars all the way down. But there was a group trying to define her brand early on, who is Lady Gaga, what she is about, blah, blah, blah. Finally, her in-house camp took control of the message. So once they took control of the message, you started to see who she is, socially, politically and to find her look. Her look is progressive, by the way, so what it is today is not the same as two years ago. But what it does is it separates her immediately from all of the other 20 million bands that are out there that are trying to carve their niche. So he was like a huge fan of Lady Gaga, like a huge fan, a big fan. So what would you say to culture of her brand is if you were to summarize it? [Audience] So that’s a lot of information. That’s a lot of information. So if you are pointing out about seven or eight things that defined her brand, #1, she mobilized her audience and gave them a name. They are the monsters. So this means that in many respects, my fans are my fans. So when I speak, I am not speaking to you, I am not speaking even to the people who go on iTunes or Amazon or anywhere else who are not fans and make negative comments because I make music for the monsters. That’s very important. That’s also very important for corporations out there who – this is why the analytics work so well. With the analytics, you are able to look at the information, then do your targeting and say this is who I am trying to reach, this is what it’s all about. We are doing music right now in a way it’s never been done before because of all the social media tools that are available. Another thing that you pointed out about Lady Gaga is that she has a social and a political message. And I think it was recently – I am not sure – but I believe it was target of one of the retailers that had a difference of opinion, I believe, with her message or the fans of her music or a cause that she didn’t agree with. So she made it known to them, “Listen, if you are not going to support my monsters and their ideology, then I don’t necessarily want you to carry my product.” Now, I don’t know which store it was for sure since we are live streaming. But her political and social position is much part of the culture of a brand as a music. So if you take personal branding today, and you want to separate yourself, if you want to do it the most efficient way, start defining your brand early. Define who you are. it’s no longer good enough to be the best singer even though there is a new [inaudible] voice and it’s about focusing on the voice. Previously, you could just focus on the voice and the best singer would be the one. But today, with transparency, real time all this information available 24 hours a day, you have to be willing to define what your band is, what the culture of your brand is early on, and it will help you to carve out your niche and kind of take off and get out in front of everybody, or at least theoretically, it allowed you to take off. So I am going to align — [Informal Talk] So I was going to give an example of Cisco. How many are familiar with product from Cisco? So what’s one of the products from Cisco that you are familiar with? [Audience] Routers, anybody else? [Audience] Switches, and yours was most important one because this is the point that I am going to make. So Cisco was known for switches and routers. Now, this is just analogy between personal branding, corporate branding showing that basically there is a lot of parallels. So inside it now that the new step will be and this is going back about 18 months, they are going to get into their own devices. They want to brand hardware. They want to put Cisco on things, and they took is great piece of product that I am a big fan of called the Flip. And the problem from my perspective is that they didn’ t utilize what I am calling again “marathon branding” and start to seed the public with the idea that Cisco would now offer more than just routers and switches. It’s hard to get people to adjust to a new behavior from nowhere. As I go down 10 miles and make a ride, that’s where the milk and the flowery is, and so that becomes subconsciously my habit. If you move the milk somewhere else for the first couple of months, I still want to get there, start to make that right and then adjust and make the left. No one was looking for hardware from Cisco. They weren’t looking for earphones, they are not looking for anything, they are looking for switches, routers, infrastructure. So the marathon branding approach is the idea – beyond the lining thing, it’s the culture of you – but the idea that you start to see the new behavior early and you stick with it. So I think one of the challenges that Cisco had was that, #1, they weren’t willing to run the marathon. They gave it a shot. They tried, and much to my dismay, because I am a big fan of the Flip, they decided to kill the product. It’s no longer even in the product line anymore, and it went away. So when you are establishing a new behavior, when you are a brand and it’s been around, and you want to transition, you want to start to introduce new features, new products, you have to see to behavior early. Another example I wanted to give is Google. As Google was beginning to move into music, which is not what you think, you Google for information, you Google for Gmail, check your Gmail. You don’t necessarily Google for music, not yet. Now, there is rumors and there is links and things that say that now Google is going to focus on music. How many people in are aware of that? So there is 10 or 12 people who are aware that music is going to be a part of the culture of Google. Well, my suggestion would be to Google, take a page out of the music industry one of the very few pages that you would take because it took a long time and the music industry is still adjusting to what this new world is, but take a page out just from this [inaudible], link it. When you hear the music is being linked from an artist, it’s normally the labels themselves linking it. Nobody hacked into a server, none of that happened. This is a way of beta testing the product, hoping that the community will decide what the single is. If Google is going to be a place for music, then they should go ahead and step out now and start to talk about Google being the place for music. And accompanying that did it and does it very well, Microsoft, they are in the marathon branding. They will take something like the Xbox which is a great gaming device, great console. And they will say, “Listen, we are late to the space, we didn’t get in early. We are going to set aside x amount of dollars, and we want to carve. Well, we didn’t lose money on the hardware. Xbox is not a profitable piece of hardware but we are in for the long haul. We will fine- tune the product but we are here,” and they started talking about it, they delivered. It’s a great console, center of your living room, and they rolled it out. Today, all of us – not all of us – but at some point, if you like games, you have had an Xbox. And they integrated, which again I should actually say I participated in that. I went down to New Zealand and Australia and helped introduce the social medial integration into the Xbox a couple of years ago. But I only put that example so that you could see that Xbox Microsoft even with Bing search, everybody knows what Bing is now. So Microsoft has a history of going the distance in terms of branding, marathon branding, getting in, sticking with it and riding it. On this one point with Cisco – because I don’ t know what the other things they are doing – but when they decided to go from infrastructure switches to hardware, I don’t think that they thought that they would stick it out. It was a test; it was an open test without declaring it as a test. So the [inaudible] between personal branding and corporate branding are very similar, and they will be even more when you take a look – now, Apple, one of my favorites, all time, how many Apple fans in here? The whole room. Apple has a way of making sure that you know what they are doing without saying they are going to do it. They do it very well. They make sure you know what’s coming without saying what’s coming but it is coming. And right now, the next thing that they are going to do – and I will come back to this – but the next thing they are going to do is they are going to offer the locker. They are going to beat everybody to music storage, which the competitors in that space, Amazon, the music industry itself, well in some aspects, possibly Facebook and Google, I don’t know the intimate details, I am just throwing it out there. But here comes Apple again out of nowhere, how do they do it and how are they getting it done and how do they do that so fast. Well, one is that once they make a decision, it seems like for the most part, they stick with it. They link up, and they make it known without making it known that “We are coming, you better be ready and when we do it, we will make it user friendly, the interface would be great, the personal experience would be great and the design would be great.” So the personal branding and corporate branding, they are very much aligned whether it’s an artist or whether it’s a product. What I was going to say about Apple in the music industry was a few years ago, there was these deals, these licensing deals that were being cut that helped to set up the iTunes Store. So all labels had to participate. And I was happened to be with some of my music industry friends that the music industry is no longer in Hollywood or anywhere else in New York but it’s really based in Silicon Valley. And of course, at that time, they laughed, “The music industry is not in Silicon Valley.” I said, “Yes, it is, it’s now here.” It started with the creation of the mp3. Once the community had the ability to download music and share music, the control of the music industry left Hollywood, New York, and now it was controlled globally by the community. But of course, they couldn’t understand it at the time. Well, the next piece was when Apple was able to make a deal with the labels for this little project, just another little project we are doing, called the iTunes Store, and you will be able to buy music here. Well, now, it’s no longer speculation but the bulk of all music is bought through Apple, and clearly the head of the music industry, the power, the control is here in Silicon Valley. So when you are defining a brand, and again what was Apple at that time, by the way? Before Apple was music, what was Apple by the way? What did you see Apple as, personal computer? I mean no, not personal computers, but it was about video. At the end of the day, it was about art, people who are into art. They loved Apple products. Later on, after they took over the music business and now – Netflix, they are doing a great job by the way – but now, videos and entertainment, all of this equates to Apple. The culture of who they are is bigger but now arguably, not more so the near products because iPhone obviously is a great product and the rest of their products are great but Apple does a great job at just establishing their culture and also running the distant with marathon branding. So I thought that I would point those out and that I would share the fact that if you are going to shift your brand, transition, be a brand that is nimble in the marketplace going forward, the fastest way, the most efficient way is to utilize social media tools, #1, to give a gauge, the test resistance, to give a gauge on what people feel about your new shift, to – I said in the last class very quickly, we did a real short synopsis of it but I said if you take a brand that’s been around for a while in the music industry like Beyonce, when it’s time to reassert yourself, take your laying back, you come out, you point to things that were affiliated and associated with you in the past like Destiny’ s Child, it was about independent women and girl power and things like that, her new song is about girls, girls’ power. But it’s a new reinvigorated, her competition theoretically right now would have been in some aspects Rihanna and maybe couple of others. But what she did was quickly reestablished her lain, her laying, what the new culture would be about the culture of her because she truly is a marathon brander. Even when she is away, she maintains her presence and continues to add to the story, which is also one other point that I will make which is very important is you being in control of telling the story of who your brand is. It is without a doubt the most important aspect today because all your competitors want to tell your story, all of them. It’s ruthless out there right now. If you look at the competition, everybody tells the other guy’s story. But when you take control utilizing these tools and tell the story yourself, you are almost unbeatable because if they say this, then you say that. If you look at Starbucks, as Starbucks has retold the new story, and there it is – they were in the last class. There is a couple of students in the last class who are doing something around caffeine. And how many caffeine lovers in here? So only way you are going to get to these finals. Starbucks has done a fantastic job at repositioning the brand because again, they run the marathon, they embrace digital and social in a big way. And some of their competitors were beginning to get some traction. But once they reasserted themselves, embraced it [inaudible] shot out to their digital hit, Steve, he does a great job, senior vice president, of understanding and pushing forward. I happen to know him where, I know him from my Twitter stream. He is always on checking people out and interacting. So if your brand has been around for a while, and you want to decide to reposition yourself, there is no better place, no better platform than social media and using the social tools to do that. Before we go too far or get too far, I had a couple – I want to step aside at least 5 or 10 minutes to answer a couple of questions, and I had a couple of more things I wanted to say. So I think you had a question earlier, Jim, or you made a statement earlier. [Audience] Yeah, right, and what was your thoughts around the Flip, the whole – we can all it the [inaudible] some aspects? [Audience] [Video clip] We are working with Jonathan Kaplan, yeah. What was the atmosphere like for Flip within the Cisco culture? [Video clip] So even though our focus is on branding, you saw that I put culture runs parallel with branding. And what you just described was that there was a tremendous culture clash, that the cultures didn’t mix. So even internally, there was a big problem with the culture. So the culture of what Flip was, and I know Jonathan and I was at Flip at the beginning and I used to come over to the office, San Francisco, because again if it’s around your rich media social, I am there, I will sniff you out real quick. So the culture at San Francisco for Flip was outstanding. You come up there. First of all, you guys were right there – what’s the little street [inaudible]? [Audience] Overlooking to Ballpark in the Marina, well, that’s great for creativity, as a great starting place. And so I used to go over there but culture around branding is so important that this is what I was going to actually say about Google. So if Google is shifting into music, anybody ever been over to the Google campus? Isn’t that like the greatest playground, circus, you had about five different restaurants in the lunchroom, seven chefs? Now, that is a great environment, very akin to music, open colors, all of that. So if I am Google, and my actual culture is, if you ever come to visit us, we have got the greatest creative lively volleyball, the founders right around on futuristic scooters, this is all happening in real life. So music obviously is a natural part of what Google is, I mean that’s entertainment, that’s creativity. So I would start to market the culture of who I really am. I am not just search; I am not just your mail. I am actually the most creative place arguably in the valley and arguably would be Facebook. Facebook would say [inaudible] right there holding your tracks, and I am a big fan of Facebook as well. But I am saying if I am Google, and I am getting ready to shift into music, I will start my marathon branding now. My new introduction is meet what we really look like, the people who work here, the atmosphere. You can wash your clothes at Google if you worked here. Did you know that? And it’s all you [inaudible] work, you don’t know, you don’t have to go — [Audience] Okay, well, because music, creation, creating of content, it comes from the same side of the brain. That’s why so many artists love devices. It’s a natural extension of their personality, the creativity, it goes beyond – it doesn’t matter genre of music. You will find that musicians love smartphones, love laptops, love checking in on Foursquare. It’s from the same side of the brain, it’s the same characteristics. That’s what the connection is. And what I was saying was that when you have a brand and a culture like Google, you actually already have built in what you need to shift when you begin to introduce new features or new products into the family, and that was the point I was making. So that environment is one of the best environments. I used to go there every week about five or six years ago and sit down with Jennifer Feikin, who was one of the creators of – founders of Google Video, an orchid who was an actual person, and sit down with orchid and talk about things. But I would look and see this great campus in this beautiful environment. And so I am only saying there is a part of marathon branding and the culture of who you are. If you utilize that, it makes it a lot easier to introduce new characteristics to transition of your brand that’s been around for a while. All those things are easier. So social media has created transparency. This transparency has created an opportunity for you to extend the life of your brand and the wholeness of who you are. Previously, the only way to get this information out was a short story here in a magazine. If a writer does a story here and maybe if you get lucky, something happens out of the norm, you end up on a news, good or bad, infamous or famous. But with social media and all these platforms in real time, we are able to tell the story and get it out. So if you are going to create new behaviors, introduce new products, do these things, marathon branding is great to use the social media tools. [Audience] Well, we could go a few ways with that. One of the problems that has previously been created by both, the celeb brand and the controllers of the messaging of the brand is that there is this spotless, flawless individual whether he is a musician or not, whoever he is, and it’s not realistic. One of the things I love about Nike is – again talking about marathon branding – Nike allows for its athletes, celebs it is connected with, to have flaws, to be real, to have challenges. And they don’t just bail out like a lot of brands do. They don’t just bail out. So now, if you see the Nike product affiliated or associated with an athlete or entertainer that has had any type of challenge, it’s not big news to you, it’s not abrasive to how you perceive the product because again, I call them a marathon brander. They made a decision in house that they would stick with Michael Vick in some aspect. They stick with Tiger Woods. And so the consumer initially, there may be some feedback, blowback. But what happens is as they see that listen, we have always been human, and that’s what I mean by the whole. So in some aspects, Charlie Sheen, he told you, “I am winning, man. It doesn’t matter that from your perspective, I am no longer with my current job or partying little too much from your perspective, whatever it is that you think, here I am transparent, here is my message. I am winning.” It at least allowed him to balance the field. Immediately, he balanced the field for his brand. So my take is that if you utilize these tools and even though, as you just pointed out, there may come a time where you there is the parting of interest, it goes back to when you just saw politically happening between President Obama and who – just like yesterday. [Informal Talk] So you would have two things happening, and you have your interest, and then you have your moral position and that’s what they are debating, the interest and moral positions, the big debate. No matter what side of the face, no matter how deep you dig, moral and interest. That’s being played out right before. And sometimes you just have to let these things play out, be debated, and then you try to take best practices and work them out. So that’s the same thing of being whole and being open and being transparent. You have got to take the good with the bad. [Audience] The challenge with that is that most of the companies that are small, they don’t take small anymore. It happens – you have to turn away capital these days, currently in this environment. But to your point, if I were to just think of some small companies that are doing things, there is a ton of them because I like to start up culture. So there is a lot of startups right now, they are doing a lot of great things. Look at the App Store, like look at your favorite apps on the iPad, a lot of those apps are already so much a part of my day-to-day life but I couldn’t do without them. I wouldn’t want to do without them. And on the other side, I have to say that companies like Flipboard, I really love their product, and I am a big fan of it. The way – consuming, social media, any digital magazine, the way that it’s done is outstanding. So that’s the company that I like a lot that’s smaller right now but won’t be smaller long. [Audience] Right, so they just start actually doing that so a presence in the community. So if they create a presence in the community outside of their core competency, so in other words, a lot of us do charity work together here in the valley all the time all kind of causes. Now, why not take those tools, all of the tools, and let some of the kids in the community tell their stories, and their stories are brought to you by Google. So if you are going into my old neighborhood, in East Oakland, and you empower and give the tools and say, “Listen, what is your story? What do you hope to be? Wait, let’s make a short film on it. We are going to make a 10-minute film. We are going to provide you tools. Google has just partnered with, in my case, Brookdale Recreation Center. They are going to put the tools there. You can come there now. When you create your story, you know that Google cared enough to come to your community.” And believe me, this is all hypothetical because they do a ton of charity work as well. But it was Google who supplied the necessary means for me to tell my story. I think it’s a good starting point, to do things like that in the communities that you are targeting and the demos that you are targeting, show them that you care about being there. I think it would be a good start because it becomes organic and authentic. [Audience] So just initially, social media or any of these platforms started before we called them social media. So you go back to the YouTube initial era, utilizing YouTube to just get the archives out there was a big important part of my own personal brand by saying that you may know me for one song, here is another song, another song, here is another album, here is another short film you may have missed about, the life of Hammer, all of these things. When YouTube first started, before it became the hymn that is today but in his infancy, I had a lot of presence with a lot of my historical music work there and it helped introduce it or reintroduce it to different audiences. And so they were able to get a bigger snapshot of who I am again as a whole brand. Secondly, before it was considered real time in transparency, any negative feedback I was always quick to remove the [inaudible] and communicate back with the crowd, not to the extent that I was trying to necessarily create a new fan but to just create to human aspect that we just spoke about. So once I was able to humanize who I am, I am not a fictitious character from another planet but I am actually a person beyond the music, beyond the song, beyond the dance. And that connection utilizing those tools early on also helped to deal with any purported negative feedback because I know my brand better than anybody. So I also knew at the same time that if I am a brand and I am the leader in the space and let’s say I sell 10 billion pairs of sneakers, there might be another brand out there who is envious of my brand. But at the end of the day, they are still only selling 10 pairs of sneakers. So I am not going to put too much emphasis on my competitors, and I always knew that as well as a brand. I know my brand. So when there is negative feedback, I also consider the source of the feedback and are they truly a fan or the product or competition. And if it’s competition, then I address it in one aspect and hopefully give them enough information to give them a new perspective. But if it’s a fan, I try to give them enough information to alleviate any fears so that they can continue to engage for the whole ride, the whole story. So that’s how I utilize social media. I am there for – again, whether it’s good, bad or otherwise but I am wise enough to pick and choose on who I engage with. So if I choose to engage you, that means that I see a tremendous upside in answering your challenge and answering the competitiveness because I believe that my brand overall and in the marathon of it all, in the long term, that I will come out shining on the other side. So that’s kind of my approach to that. [Audience] Well, the reason why I put the word ‘marathon’ out in front of branding is that you have to be committed, because the initial feedback when you start to define the brand initially may not be when you thought. You may not get to the desired results initially. People may not know who you are. Another good example, if we just use musicians, in this case is Nicki Minaj. So who she is today is not who she was when she first started. But at some point, if you Google her and look at her history, you will see that she started to introduce more characteristics of who she is as she went along. And I remember in our house early on, I told two of my daughters that I like Nicki Minaj, which for them it was like, “Dad, what, what, you know dad.” I said, initially, I see a whole lot of talent there, is what I told my daughters. I said, “I am not listening to every word she is rapping right now, that you listen to every word. Daddy is not listening to every word.” I am looking at talent right here. And I felt as though because in my household as a father, I am putting my other hat on, I am raising five kids and two nephews. So I am not the biggest fan of a tremendous amount of profanity being thrown around my house that’s there. So when they heard me say I like Nicki Minaj early, her early music, they were like there but you don’t always subscribe to [inaudible]. Well, that’s not what I am telling you. What I am telling is I am seeing other people attack who she is, is what I said at that time. And I said, but I see a greater brand down the road. And I am certainly not architect but I have watched her evolve into what I thought she could become [inaudible] really is to her because I see that she is very independent, and she asserts herself. And so what I am really saying is that initially, the feedback that you are looking for might not be the feedback that you get but you have to be willing to run the marathon. Now, in music, that’s tough because there is a tremendous amount of pressure to make quarterly numbers, which is what helped run the music business because we went from, I want to make a great album and I put 14 songs on. And song #1 and song #14 actually connect. There is a story here. But when they introduced first week numbers, they changed the entire music business. They changed it to a game of sport of who hits the most homeruns in the first week, not even in the season. You may hit 10 homeruns the first week and that’s it. At the end of the year, how many did you hit, 10. But they wanted to make quarterly numbers, they needed to. And so they put the emphasis on the first week, the first quarter, is what they were trying to do. And so now, you had to pay for point of purchase. So stores like – and it wasn’t obviously just Best Buy at the time because I am going all the way back – but Best Buy had to charge you for point of purchase. So if you want that new album out front for the first week, you want counter space. It was 50 cents what is counter space now it’s $2 because you want it for this week. So that changed the dynamic. So now, the record companies could no longer stick with an artist for the marathon for their brand because they had to make first quarter number. So you wouldn’t have had the opportunity which again is kudos to Cash Money in their company and Birdman because who Nicki is, they allowed her and stuck with it and watch the brand grow. So the parallel for you is – I am making the analogy of making is that even if you don’t get the feedback initially, if you determine from the beginning that you want to be in it for this brand for the marathon, then it allows you to get the feedback, being [inaudible], change some of the characteristics based upon the feedback from the community and the crowd not for competitors. This is most important for the music business. Most of the fans and followers on certain sites all want to be musicians. So you are never going to get – nobody is getting five stars because most of the fans around those sites want to be the artists. But if you can carve out who actually likes the artist, you can look at the analytics and tell who really is Genie Wine, and the affection for that artist, then you can begin to shape the brand a little better. So I hope that answered some of what you were asking. [Audience] Well, today, again, we have to be sensitive because we are streaming. So even when I just named some of the names, I was being sensitive to fans and businesspeople affiliating associated, watching and maybe not understating we are doing strictly business. But right now, in that space, in the space of entertainment, characters probably are working better. Again, if you look at top 10 artists and you point out the characteristics of the top five, those are not normal people walking around that are going to walk and sit next to you in the way that they either address or they are positioning. So right now, to cut through, you might want to get a purple hat and pink shirt and some green shoes just to walk and catch everybody’s attention. And then once you get their attention, because again we are talking about marathon and the whole person, you start to introduce the other characteristics. Again, if you go back, Lady Gaga day one to Lady Gaga today with an agenda, a political position, a social position, mobilized, crowdsource, audience, monsters, little masters, this is who I am, all of that now from here. So characters could be very powerful as long as you don’t overdo it for the long haul. So that’s going to be it, don’t overdo it for the long haul, and they do it on their own. I am watching from an artistic standpoint. The artists who take their character to a certain point – I have got a bunch of keys so I understand – the characters, they will take it to a certain point, then they pull back on their own now, like – and not to overemphasize it. But Lady Gaga said, ” This is who I am, this is who I am. Wait a minute, I don’t like you. You are talking negative against a certain group of individuals, and I want my voice heard.” So characters step aside, and now the woman would like to say something to you. I don’t agree with your message and here is my message, I am going to defend this particular cause or group. So I watch artists today. They all create a character but then they will also step outside of the character and deal with issues. Unlike previously, we have had in the last 10 years certain athletes who never addressed one issue, who had all of voice could have address issues, could have been very helpful in a lot of ways. But if you look at their history, they never addressed one issue. They were happy to be athlete. They remained — [Informal Talk] Well, there is a couple of them though but they remain nameless, and that’s okay because again, it can’t be forced upon you. You can’t join your activism class and say, “I am an activist,” and you walk around Stanford all day to send your activism, somebody would say, “Well, what’s your issue? ” “I am an activist.” It’s not going to work too long. You have to really have an idea and issue, it has to be organic to be engaging. [Audience] Well, for me, personally, I really view the world as real, real time, actual real time. And again, I am also keenly and acutely aware that the National Archives bought the Twitter [inaudible]. You do know that. So every twit is being held forever and [inaudible], all of you twits, not some of them, every one of them wanting to the national historic archives to be recalled 500 years from now, and I am aware of that. So for me, if I twit it, I can stand by it. If I twit it even as a joke, I can live with it because one of the things that I am emphasizing as a personal brand and marathon branding is I am effused to be one thing because I don’t know anybody who is just one thing. Even if you look at all of your heroes historically, we know that they all had flaws. So I don’t want to be the flawless hero or Mr. Perfect. None of those guys or brands will survive in today’s real-time world. The new heroes will be the heroes that have flaws. That’s the new heroes, why, because they really like you, they are closer to you. So the old positioning of creating this character, spotless, sinless, blah, blah, blah, it won’t work. And if you take that position, you don’t have to overanalyze every twit. You don’t have to worry about everybody do they agree with it. And by the way, say you guys are going to run enterprise, and you are going to run the new businesses, you also won’t judge your employees the way they are saying you want to be a judged. In other words, what are they telling you that you better be careful of everything you say on Facebook and on Twitter and all of that because when you go and you put your resume, and they are going to be viewing, and they are going to see that’s you and you are not going to get a job, well it depends on who is going to be reviewing. If that person also twits and has Facebook and has said something, they are going to go I have said 20 things I wish I could take back. So in the future, it won’t be as sensitive an issue. But in answer to your question, James, my thing is to be whole and to be full or possible flaws. That’s the journey; that’s the journey. In this room, if you haven’t made any mistakes, you wouldn’t be here right now. The fact that you are here is the product of some mistakes that you have made, and yet you ended up here each and every one of you guys. So branding really is – marathon branding is about understanding that from the beginning. Build that into who you are, build that into your brand, listen, I am not flawless but I can tell you that if we were to argue, Republican and Democrats, I have said before the election, I said wow, Republicans won’t get this back for 16 years. Sam, what are you talking about, they haven’t even lost a person for four years. I said no, they won’t get it back, why, because they are pointing out every flaw of everybody that they can. And then what that does is [inaudible] because now, they turn the camera back and say, oh, you did this and you are saying that his platform is not the one I should vote for because he is not flawless. Well, you see what happened with that was even two years in, I want to see your birth certificate. It’s the way it works. Once you start focusing on [inaudible], I am going to find a flaw, even recently you mentioned it earlier, Jason and you [inaudible] I won’t pull that name back out but name started saying again, I am going to go to this issue, that issue got handled, and what’s the next issue. Let me see the academic record. It’s nonsense. This is not what we are about in this generation. We want substance. We live in a real time. We want to know how we are going to fix and solve problems and issues, and no one person or one man has to but the community can solve because the other side of social media – and I am setting aside branding right now, I am just talking specifically social media – is that now we can crowdsource information from the world. So all of this distant learning, all of these brands are all now connected. So when we say solve it, it’s not just solve it me, it’s not just solve it Stanford, it’s all of us solve it and we are all connected, and we can give input. It’s a whole new world, it’s a whole new place, a whole new paradigm shift. [Audience] So for my daughter Kiba’s personal brand, so she is [inaudible]. She graduated from the University of Texas last year. [Informal Talk] What I hope for Kiba, well what I am doing is that Kiba is comfortable enough that she is taking my advice to feel like she is not under any pressure to be anything other than whatever she wants to be, whatever she wants to do, but utilize these tools. I mean she is — [Informal Talk] She is 23 now. You are saying in the operated 18, so I know you can sing, you [inaudible]. You got two degrees in four years so I know you can think. So she is academic, and you always have been very independent. You have left, graduated and went to Spain for six months. I had a concert in Belgium, and you showed up. You navigated through Europe by yourself. So — [Informal Talk] So I know you know how to navigate the world. I know you have talents and gifts and everything. So my dream for you is whatever makes you happy but do it, just do it, do it comfortably. That’s what I hope for her brand. I hope that brand ultimately really means to somebody that you are [inaudible] that you will impact the world from humanity standpoint. No matter what the gifts you use, at the end, they will also say she is a good person, she helped them do this or helped with that. [Informal Talk] So for those of you guys who want to know more about sort of social technology from a personal brand perspective, go online and just Google Hammer at Stanford. He has a couple of videos. Last year, he did one for Power of Social Technology with Robert Scoble, Loic Le Meur and also Garth Saloner. So that’s on video. So I would encourage you to check that out because the chapters that go by with Hammer at Stanford are quite remarkable. And Sunday, he is going to let out that personal brand case. It is a gorgeous piece of work on personal brands. Thanks so much, Hammer. Well, thank you.

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